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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for March 18th, 1862 AD or search for March 18th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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d I trust you will be able to concentrate a force which will defeat either attempt. The fleet which you will soon have on the Mississippi River, if the enemy's gunboats ascend the Tennessee, may enable you to strike an effective blow at Cairo; but, to one so well informed and vigilant, I will not assume to offer suggestions as to when and how the ends you seek may be attained. With the confidence and regard of many years, I am very truly your friend, Jefferson Davis. Decatur, Alabama, March 18, 1862. my dear General: I received the dispatches from Richmond, with your private letter by Captain Wickliffe, three days since; but the pressure of affairs and the necessity of getting my command across the Tennessee prevented me from sending you an earlier reply. I anticipated all that you tell as to the censures which the fall of Fort Donelson drew upon me, and the attacks to which you might be subjected; but it was impossible for me to gather the facts for a detailed report, or spa
he soldierly C. F. Smith to his cause. That the strength of Shiloh has not been overstated is evinced by the evidence of General Sherman, given then and afterward. He says, in his Memoirs, vol. i., page 229: The position was naturally strong. .... At a later period of the war, we could have rendered this position impregnable in one night, but at this time we did not do it, and it may be it is well we did not. He says of it in a letter to Grant's adjutant-general, Rawlins, March 18, 1862 (page 232): Magnificent plain for camping and drilling, and a military point of great strength. On the next day (page 233), he expresses himself- Strongly impressed with the importance of this position, both for its land advantages and its strategic position. The ground itself admits of easy defense by a small command, and yet affords admirable camping-ground for 100,000 men. On the trial of Colonel Thomas Worthington, Forty-sixth Ohio Volunteers, who had severely criticised