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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 334 334 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 25 25 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 14 14 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for April, 1862 AD or search for April, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
cessary to the Federal Government to enable it to crush out rebellion, and the only way to obtain this control was to build a fleet peculiarly adapted to smooth and shallow waters, while carrying the heaviest smooth-bore and rifled ordnance. Strange as it may at this day appear, some of the Army officers argued that gunboats would be useless to co-operate with the Army in the West, as the Confederates would establish heavy forts all along the rivers, and knock the vessels to pieces; in April, 1862, after the war had progressed for a year, General Leonidas Polk seized upon tie heights near Belmont, Ky., and mounting heavy guns there blocked the way for Army transports from Cairo to the sea. Then the Army began to talk of improvising a Navy of their own, and the Navy Department sent Commander John Rodgers to St. Louis to superintend the construction of an army flotilla. While the North had its Ericsson, the West was fortunate in possessing, in the person of Mr. James B. Eads, the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
erience. Rear-Admiral Smith, with the other officers whom Mr. Secretary Welles had to assist him, formed a fine combination, and although the former was advanced in years at the breaking out of the war, and not very robust, yet he was ever punctual in the performance of his duties. Such men as we have mentioned assisted greatly in lightening the labors of the venerable Secretary of the Navy, and enabled him to carry the Navy successfully through a great crisis. It was sometime in April, 1862, that the Department determined to build up an ironclad navy on the Ericsson idea, and by December of that year twenty single-turreted Monitors were contracted for, or under construction, all their plans having been made ready for the assembling of Congress. These vessels were to be of about 614 tons displacement, excepting a few of 844 tons. They were very much larger than the original Monitor and were designed to carry two 15-inch guns in a revolving turret. The idea of the first Mon