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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 334 334 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 25 25 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 14 14 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for April, 1862 AD or search for April, 1862 AD in all documents.

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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 5: casualties compared with those of European wars — loss in each arm of the service — deaths from disease — classification of deaths by causes. (search)
fire-arms, explosions of ammunition, and railway accidents; in the cavalry service, a large number of accidental deaths resulted from poor horsemanship. The number of the drowned may seem large, but the average is less than three men to a regiment. This loss was occasioned largely by bathing and boating. At times, some regiment would sustain a larger loss while fording rivers, or landing from small boats in the surf. The Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, while crossing the Shenandoah, in April, 1862, lost 2 officers and 51 men, drowned by the swamping of a scow. Of the Union soldiers confined in Confederate prisons, 24,866 died of disease, exclusive of 2,072 who died of wounds while in the enemy's bands, and 3,218 others who died from various causes, known and unknown. As to what proportion of these 24,866 deaths was due to harsh treatment, instead of disease, it would be difficult to say. In the Northern military prisons, where the inmates were furnished with good food and quart
. Cedar Mountain Rappahannock Gainesville Groveton Second Bull Run South Mountain Antietam Fredericksburg Fitzhugh's Crossing Chancellorsville Gettysburg Mine Run. The First Corps, when at its maximum, contained 46 regiments of infantry and 12 batteries of light artillery. It was organized in March, 1862, with three divisions,--King's, McCall's, and Franklin's. General Irwin McDowell was placed in command. When General McClellan moved the Army to the Peninsula, in April, 1862, McDowell's corps was left in Northern Virginia. Franklin's Division was ordered, soon after, to the Peninsula, where it was used in forming the Sixth Corps, its place in McDowell's command being taken by Ricketts' Division. In June, McCall's Division — the famous Pennsylvania Reserves--was also sent to the Peninsular Army, but upon the return of McClellan's forces to Washington, the Reserves rejoined McDowell, and fought under him at Second Bull Run. During the absence of the Army of
ederick, Md. It commenced active service in April, 1862, in the Shenandoah Valley, then in Hartsuff it remained during its entire service. In April, 1862, the Fifty-second accompanied the corps to m on an expedition to Mathias Point, Va. In April, 1862, the brigade left its winter-quarters in Maned in Virginia, near Fairfax Seminary. In April, 1862, the division — Franklin's — moved to YorktWashington, where it remained on duty until April, 1862, when it joined McClellan's Army, then in fed Hooker's Division. It took the field in April, 1862, moving up the Peninsula with the Third Cor It served in Burnside's Department, and in April, 1862, was assigned to Nagle's Brigade, Reno's Dito Grafton, W. Va., where it remained until April, 1862. During the spring of 1862 it served in Scof 250 engaged, as officially reported. In April, 1862, the Twenty-fifth Kentucky, having become m to St. Louis. It served in Missouri until April, 1862, when it was ordered to Corinth. During th[1 more...]<
and the 115th Ohio lost 83 killed in the same accident. Ohio regiments had the honor of furnishing the twenty-two soldiers who captured a locomotive and made the famous railroad raid along the line of the Atlanta & Chattanooga Railroad, in April, 1862. It was a daring deed, and without an equal in its thrilling story of danger, intrepidity, heroic suffering, and death. Daring and Danger: by the Rev. William Pittinger (2d Ohio). The men who were detailed to carry out this wild romance wein the field, and secured for their State a full share of the laurels of the war. Prominent among these was Hall's Iowa Brigade, of the Seventeenth Corps, composed of the 11th, 13th, 15th, and 16th Regiments. These troops were brigade thus in April, 1862, under command of Colonel Crocker of the 13th Iowa, and served together until mustered out in July, 1865. Crocker, having been promoted Brigadier, was succeeded by Colonel Hall of the 11th, who was in turn succeeded, in August, 1864, by Gener