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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 8 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 4 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for April 11th, 1862 AD or search for April 11th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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ce. I have the honor to be your Excellency's very obedient servant, A. Willich, Colonel Commanding Thirty-second Indiana Volunteers. Colonel Harrison's report. headquarters Thirty-Ninth regiment, battle-ground, Pittsburgh, Tenn., April 11, 1862. Col. Gibson, Commanding Sixth Brigade: sir: On the seventh instant, the Thirty-ninth regiment of Indiana Volunteers was the last of your command to disembark at Pittsburgh Landing. At half-past 10 o'clock, guided by the din of battle, weI have the honor to remain, sir, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, M. M. Trumbull, Capt. Third Iowa Infantry, Comd'g Regiment. Gen. Beauregard's (rebel) report. headquarters of the army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., April 11, 1862. General: On the second ultimo, having ascertained conclusively, from the movements of the enemy on the Tennessee River, and from reliable sources of information, that his aim would be to cut off my communications in West-Tennessee with th
Doc. 126.-the fall of Fort Pulaski, Ga. April 11, 1862. On Wednesday, April ninth, the batteries on Tybee being completed, order was given to open fire on the fdier-General Viele. headquarters United States forces, Savannah River, April 11, 1862. sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations P. Rodgers, Commander. Terms of capitulation. Fort Pulaski, Ga., April 11, 1862. Gen. H. W. Benham, Commanding Northern District, Department of the South, rrender to the United States of Fort Pulaski, Ga., signed by me this eleventh day of April, 1862. I trust these terms will receive your approval, they being substheadquarters Northern District, Department of the South, Tybee Island, Ga., April 11, 1862. Major-Gen. D. Hunter, United States Army, Commanding Department of the Souesire, subject to the inspection of a Federal officer. Signed the eleventh day of April, 1862, at Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Ga. Chas. H. Olmstead, Col First
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 129.-occupation of Huntsville, Ala. April 11, 1862. (search)
Doc. 129.-occupation of Huntsville, Ala. April 11, 1862. A correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette gives the following account of the march and occupation: We have achieved a victory which, although bloodless, must be attended by such important results as can hardly be over-estimated. The main line, and for all practical military purposes, the only line of communication between the eastern and western armies of the enemy, is in our hands. To General Mitchel and his brave troops belongs the distinguished honor of being the first to penetrate to the great Charleston and Memphis Railroad, and the first to break through the rebels' boasted line of defence, extending from Chattanooga to Corinth. The advance from Fayetteville to Huntsville was made with the full expectation that at the latter place there would be a terrible struggle. Every one knew the importance of the railroad to the enemy; every one supposed that they would guard it with the utmost vigilance, and every one p
Doc. 130.-the Second visit of the Merrimac. April 11, 1862. The following is the account given by the Baltimore American's correspondent: Fortress Monroe, Friday, April 11. I said two days since, that we were looking for the Merrimac and sunshine together. Both are here this morning. The day opened bright and clear, with the broad expanse of Hampton Roads almost unruffled by a wave. About seven o'clock a signal-gun from the Minnesota turned all eyes toward Sewell's Point, and coming out from under the land, almost obscured by the dim haze, the Merrimac was seen, followed by the York-town, Jamestown, and four smaller vessels, altogether seven in number. There was instantaneous activity among the transports and vessels in the Upper Roads, to get out of the way. Steamboats, several of which were crowded with troops, moved down out of danger. Steam-tugs ran whist-ling and screaming, towing strings of vessels behind them, whilst sloops, schooners and brigs took advantag