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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 8 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 4 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for April 11th, 1862 AD or search for April 11th, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), District of Columbia, (search)
n of a circuit court, composed of a chief-justice and two assessors; the judgment of this court to be final in criminal cases, but in civil cases, where the amount in dispute exceeded $100 in value, a writ of error to lie in the Supreme Court of the United States. This arrangement was afterwards modified. Instead of providing a homogeneous code of laws for the District, those of Maryland and Virginia were continued. A bill to abolish slavery in the District was passed by the Congress (April 11, 1862), and became a law by the signature of the President, April 16. It provided for the payment, out of the treasury of the United States, of an average of $300 to the master or mistress of each slave thus emancipated. Thus emancipation began at the national capital. In connection with this event was a curious proceeding. A free negro of the District, who had bought and paid for his slave wife, she and her children being, by the slave code, his lawful slaves, claimed and received compen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Macon, Fort, capture of (search)
e Atlantic coast for National vessels engaged in the blockading service. It stood upon a long ridge of sand cast up by the ocean, called Bogue Island. After the capture of Newbern (q. v.), Burnside sent General Parke to take the fort. A detachment took possession of Beaufort, and a flag was sent to the fort demanding its surrender. The commander of the garrison, a nephew of Jefferson Davis, declared he would not yield until he had eaten his last biscuit and slain his last horse. On April 11, 1862, Parke began a siege. Batteries were erected on Bogue Island, and gunboats, under Commodore S. Lockwood, co-operated with the troops. The garrison was cut off from all communication with the outside world by land or water. A bombardment was begun on the morning of April 25. The fort responded with great spirit and vigor, and a tremendous artillery duel was kept up for several hours, when the fort displayed a white flag. Before 10 A. M. on the 26th the fort was in possession of the Na
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tybee Island, (search)
Tybee Island, An island off the entrance to the Savannah River, belonging to Chatham county, Ga.; noted as the place where Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore (q. v.) erected the batteries with which he breached Fort Pulaski on Cockspur Island, on April 11, 1862.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ac for the Peninsula commenced at Alexandria......March 17, 1862 Battle of Kernstown, or Winchester, Va.; Brig.-Gen. James Shields defeats Stonewall Jackson......March 23, 1862 Siege of Yorktown, Va., commenced by General McClellan......April 5, 1862 Battle of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn.......April 6-7, 1862 Island Number10, in the Mississippi, evacuated by the Confederates......April 7, 1862 Huntsville, Ala., occupied by the United States forces under Gen. O. M. Mitchel......April 11, 1862 Bill abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia passes the Senate April 3, 29 to 14, and the House April 11, 92 to 39; approved......April 16, 1862 [The average compensation paid by the government for each slave was $300.] Admiral Farragut with his fleet passes Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the two forts guarding the Mississippi below New Orleans......April 24, 1862 Admiral Farragut occupies New Orleans......April 25, 1862 Gen. B. F. Butler occupies New Orleans with hi