hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 14 14 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 8 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 16, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 3, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for April 15th, 1862 AD or search for April 15th, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 45: the cruise of the Sumter and the havoc she committed. (search)
e paymaster of the Sumter was of little consequence one way or another, and whether he was a prisoner, or at large, made not much difference. Semmes tried in vain to procure the release of his officer, for the United States Government had considerable prestige, and was every day growing more powerful. Mr. Secretary Seward was assuming a determined tone to which foreign powers were forced to listen. After much correspondence the unlucky paymaster was released from confinement and placed on parole as a prisoner-of-war. As it was impossible to get to sea, the Sumter was finally laid up at Gibraltar in charge of a midshipman, while Semmes and some of his officers, on the 15th of April, 1862, embarked on board the mail steamer for Southampton, in search of a better vessel with which to renew their depredations on United States commerce. The Sumter became a blockade-runner, and, after the war, terminated her career on some dangerous shoals in the China Sea and all her crew were lost.