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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 2 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 2 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for April 23rd, 1862 AD or search for April 23rd, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Siege and capture of Fort Pulaski. (search)
however, his situation became desperate. . . . Every man did his duty with alacrity, and, there being few guns that bore on the enemy, there was a continued contest as to who should man them. When volunteers were called for to perform any laborious duty, there was a rush of the men from every company in the fort. . . . Among the last guns fired were those on the parapet, and the men stood there exposed to a storm of iron hail to the last. [Correspondence of the Savannah Republican of April 23d, 1862.] Editors. The consternation was supreme. All hope of saving Views of Fort Pulaski after the surrender. From photographs. the city seemed lost, and the citizens began to secure themselves by sending their families and property into the interior. Their confidence in the ability of Fort Pulaski to sustain a siege had been absolute. General Henry C. Wayne, of the Confederate army, who was in Savannah at the time, was one of the first to doubt, and met with the usual fortune of prophe