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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 3 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 3 3 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for April 27th, 1862 AD or search for April 27th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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rs, which alone stood as true as steel when every other company in Fort Jackson basely dishonored its country. The St. Mary Cannoneers, Capt. F. O. Cornay, have my warmest gratitude and admiration for their whole conduct, both in face of the enemy and in the severe and arduous fatigue duties, which they displayed always and at all times, day and night, with alacrity and energy. They are an honor to the country, and well may their friends and relatives be proud of them.—Higgins' report, April 27, 1862. The troops engaged in the defense enlisted in the city, except the cannoneers. Capt. J. B. Anderson, of Company E, Louisiana artillery, although wounded early in the conflict, continued to render the most gallant service to the end. Of the same company, Lieutenant Baylor, of the 42-pounder barbette battery, and Lieutenant Agar deserve mention. Among those who acted coolly during the six days, were Lieutenants Ogden, Kennedy and Mumford, of the Louisiana artillery; Lieutenant Gaines,
ril 29, 1862, the city had for the first time formally surrendered to Flag-officer Farragut. Before this date, not after it, Mumford had torn the flag down from a public building. The city, until the surrender had been accomplished, was still under the authority of its own municipal officers. The State, of which the city was a part, was still a State of secession, a State not yet brought into a Union of which she had declared herself independent. Before the surrender was effected, on April 27, 1862, the flag of the United States was a foreign flag. As such, that flag possessed no more authority as a symbol than that of France or Spain, two governments that, like the United States, had at one time wielded authority in Louisiana. An insult to the flag constituted, under such circumstances, an act of war; in no sense an overt act of treason. It could not under those circumstances deserve the penalty of death. Before the military commission had decided against Mumford, however, the