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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 13 13 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 15, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 9, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for April 28th, 1862 AD or search for April 28th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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From the Southwest.[Special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Memphis, Tenn., April 28, 1862. The all-absorbing theme of conversation now is the threatened occupation of New Orleans by the enemy. As yet we have no authentic advices from there, upon which we can construct a historic narrative of events; but enough is known to satisfy us that the great metropolis of the South has nobly done her duty. Thirteen gunboats are at her door, and backed by their thunder, the Federal Commodore has made a demand for surrender, which the brave-hearted Mayor has refused. To use his own language, almost Roman in its simplicity, "As to hoisting any other flag than that of our adoption and allegiance, let me say to you, sir, that the man lives not in our midst whose hand and heart would not be palsied at the mere though of such an act; nor could I find in my entire constituency so wretched and desperate a renegade as would dares to profane with his hands the sacred emblem of our aspiration