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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for April 30th, 1862 AD or search for April 30th, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

nd Ford: The general cannot determine your position from the places you speak of. They are not on our maps and not known to any one here. State where you are, referring to localities mapped or generally known. James B. Fry, Colonel and Chief of Staff. No. 2.-reports of Brig. Gen. George W. Morgan, U. S. Army, commanding Seventh Division, Army of the Ohio. see also dispatches accompanying report no. 1, p. 51. Hdqrs. Seventh Division, Army of the Ohio, Cumberland Ford, April 30, 1862-10 p. m. After a reconnaissance of a day and a half party just returned. On yesterday there was a brisk skirmish, in which we had 4 wounded. The enemy's killed and wounded were carried from the field, with the exception of 1 wounded man, whom they failed to remove. One of the enemy was mortally wounded while attempting to do so. The enemy has greatly strengthened his position, and has fourteen works on this side of the mountain. According to the prisoners, whose statements are conf
facts and circumstances as they presented themselves, and in closing do not hesitate to say that great praise is due to the officers and men under his command who executed the orders, performing with cheerfulness and alacrity all the duty assigned to them. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. G. BALLElNTINE Captain Company A, Commanding Scouting!arty. To the Adjutant, First Regiment Tennessee Cavalry. [Indorsement.] Headquarters Cavalry, Ripley, Miss., April 30, 1862. Approved and respectfully submitted to the general commanding the army. Great credit is due to Captain Ballentine and the officers and men of this command for the energy displayed on this trip. I would state for the information of the general commanding that there is a large supply of cotton, purchased by a firm in Memphis, stored at Brownsville, and I am informed that parties are purchasing cotton through the country. W. H. Jackson, Colonel, Commanding Cavalry.
eport was immediately reconstructed, and trains are now passing over it. E. Kirby Smith, Major-General, Commanding. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn., April 29, 1862. Be sure that you blow up or effectively burn the bridge before the enemy get to it. The farther side should be burnt by all means. H. L. Clay, Assistant Adjutant-General. Brig. Gen. D. Leadbetter, Chattanooga, Tenn. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn., April 30, 1862. General: The major-general commanding has been called off to Cumberland Gap in consequence of on attack on that point. He directs that you make the best defense in your power along the line of the Tennessee River. Troops have been ordered up from Georgia to re-enforce you.. He thinks that if all the boats on the river are secured and a force displayed on this side the enemy will not venture to attack. Most respectfully, your obedient servant E. Cunningham, Acting Aide-de-C
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
prisoner. Concerning the number of his wounded I could gain no information. On the 9th I moved my division some 4 miles toward Farmington, where I bivouacked for the night. On the 10th, in compliance with Special Field Orders, No. 35, April 30, 1862, from Headquarters Department of the Mississippi, my division was designated by Major-General Buell as the reserve of the center of the army before Corinth, and I encamped my command in line of battle about 11 miles in the rear of the center jutant-General, Hdqrs. Second Division (Stanley's), Army of the Misissippi. No. 42. Report of Maj. Hiram W. Love, Second Iowa Cavalry, of skirmish at Monterey, Tenn., April 29. headquarters Second Iowa Cavalry, Camp on Corinth Road, April 30, 1862. I have the honor to report that in the attack made by Colonel Elliott, Second Iowa Cavalry, upon the enemy's camp at Monterey, April 29, 1862, I was detached by Lieutenant-Colonel Hatch, Second Iowa Cavalry, and ordered to cut off his (th