hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 3 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May 1st, 1862 AD or search for May 1st, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
. J. Ford; private; members, 285; deaths, 7; Home, Austin, Texas. Camp 31. Dallas, Texas; Capt. J. D. Thurston, com.; med. offi., Wm. R. Wilson, 1862, surgeon; members, 304; disabled, 6 or 8; indigent, 4; deaths, 6; Home, Austin, Texas. Camp 32. Vicksburg, Miss.; Capt. D. A. Campbell, corn. Camp 33. Evergreen, La.; Col. M. M. Ewell, corn.; med. offi., W. P. Buck; members, 89; disabled, 5; deaths, 2. Camp 34. Dalton, Ga.; Capt. A, P. Roberts, com.; med. offi., Dr. J. R. McAfle, May 1, 1862, surgeon; members, 50; disabled, 20; deaths, 4. Camp 35. Nashville, Tenn.; Capt. R. Lin. Cave, com.; med. offi. F. W. Merrin. Camp 36. Tampa, Fla.; Capt. F. W. Merrin, corn.; med. offi., Dr. J. W. Douglas; first lieut. and capt.; members, 50; deaths, 15. Camp 37. Jackson, Tenn.; Capt. E. S. Mallory, corn. Camp 38. Donaldsonville, La.; Capt. Alexander Porche, corn.; med. offi., Dr. Leonce Richard; private; members, 92; disabled, I; deaths, 2. Camp 39. Birmingham, Ala.; G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
a queen enthroned upon the hills. Now, ennobled by her misfortunes, almost destroyed by shot and shell, scarred by battle, she stands the heroic city of the South. Shattered almost to extinction, see how she has revived. Energy and brains have more than restored her former glory. She gave herself a willing sacrifice on the altar of her country. She has risen from her ruins again a queen. Suppose we refresh our memories by glancing over the records of those days; let us look back to May 1, 1862. The Confederacy was appalled to hear that the great fleet under Farragut and the large army under Butler had entered the Mississippi river at the mouth; had reduced Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and had arrived at New Orleans, and taken possession of the defenseless city. The Mississippi, which split the Confederacy in twain, was open to them as far up as Memphis and Fort Pillow—the only two points left held by the Confederates. Vicksburg on the hills at once loomed up as the only d