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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 52 52 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for May 5th, 1862 AD or search for May 5th, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
gradually sank underneath, leaving her bow resting on the shore and above water. I have the honor to be your obedient servant, T. Bailey, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. United States Gun-Boat Cayuga, May 5, 1862. Sir — I have the honor to enclose a copy (with slight verbal alteration) of the very hasty report drawn up at the last moment and sent to the flag-officer. My absence on special duty immediately after the action, and the necessity of forwully, Your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Commanding Flotilla. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Report of Commander W. B. Renshaw, United States steamer Westfield. United States Steamer Westfield, Mississippi River, May 5, 1862. Sir — Agreeably to your order, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the United States steamer Westfield, under my command, since her arrival in the Mississippi River. Upon our reaching Pass à l'outre, on
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
enant Flusser. the gun-boats extricate themselves from a dilemma. notice of Lieutenant Cushing, his attack on the town of Jacksonville and his gallant defence of the Ellis. capture of Fort Macon by the Army and Navy. surrender of Yorktown, May 5, 1862. co-operation of the Navy. attack on Sewell's Point by Flag-officer Goldsborough. evacuation of Sewell's Point and Craney Island. Merrimac blown up by the Confederates, June 11. Susquehanna, Seminole and Dakota anchor before Norfolk. thend Navy are somewhat obscure, but it appears that a good deal of damage was inflicted upon the fort in spite of a heavy sea, which rendered the firing from the vessels somewhat uncertain. The gun-boats themselves suffered little damage. On May 5, 1862, Yorktown was evacuated by the Confederates, and General McClellan telegraphed to Captain Wm. Smith of the Wachusett to assist in communicating with Gloucester and to send some of the gun-boats up York River to reconnoitre. The flotilla was