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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 10 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for May 9th, 1862 AD or search for May 9th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
seem at all disposed to injure anything, and why our own forces should want to destroy what the enemy were taking care of cannot be understood. There was nothing in the yard but machinery which the enemy could not use, and guns which they had already mounted and which could not have been of a very dangerous character, as our ships were only struck twice each in a two days bombardment. The history of the manner in which Pensacola was held by the Confederates from April 1st, 1861 to May 9th, 1862, offers one of the most curious commentaries on the conduct of the war in this quarter. It had the best harbor in the Gulf of Mexico, belonging to the United States. It had a good navy yard, with the ordinary facilities for fitting out and repairing ships, and water enough on the bar to admit of the passage of all but five or six of the heaviest ships of the Navy. It was just the point wanted by our naval commanders from which to carry on operations against New Orleans and the coast o
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
ed with a degree of gallantry highly creditable to themselves and the Navy. I proceed to-day with the entire flotilla to New Madrid, and leave to-morrow for Fort Pillow, or the next point down the river which may attempt to resist the raising the blockade. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, [Signed] A. H. Foote, Flag-officer. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Flag-officer Davis assumed command of the squadron on the 9th of May, 1862, and had little time for reflection before he became engaged in active operations. The heights of Fort Pillow had been repeatedly shelled by the gun-boats and bombarded by the mortars, with little perceptible effect on the works. The Confederate gun-boats occasionally showed themselves around the bend in the river, but on the first movement of the squadron they would scud away. Exaggerated reports were rife about the formidable rams that were at Memphis ready to attack our fleet, amo
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
re to all the useful buildings, and most of them were destroyed; the commandant's and the officers' quarters being left intact, in hopes that the Confederate officers might have a chance some day to live in them again. Thus Norfolk became the head quarters of the Navy, as it ought to have been from the beginning of the war to the end. There had been no good reason for deserting the place, for there were as many ships in front of the town at the time when the Navy Yard was burned, as on May 9, 1862, while the Confederates were much weaker. The retreat from Norfolk was caused by a panic which sometimes seizes upon people, and leads them to do things at the moment for which they rebuke themselves when they come to their senses. The re-occupation of Norfolk Navy Yard was a great convenience to the North Atlantic squadron, which had been obliged to send most of its vessels to Philadelphia and New York for repairs, and now the operations up the James River could be carried on more ef