hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May 11th, 1862 AD or search for May 11th, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
rate batteries, on the shore. On the approach of the Virginia the Monitor and all the rest of the fleet retired below Old Point beyond her reach and never again came out. The Virginia maintained this attitude of defiance and victory until May 11th, 1862, when Norfolk was evacuated by the Confederate forces and all stores and munitions of war not movable were destroyed, including the Virginia (Merrimac). These facts are attested by eye-witnesses and actors in these events of high authorityup. Her shield was then out of water; we were not in fighting condition. We therefore ran her ashore in the bight of Craney Island, landed the crew, and set the vessel on fire. The magazine exploded about half-past 4 on the morning of the 11th of May, 1862. The crew arrived at Drewry's Bluff the next day, and assisted in defeating the Monitor, Galena, and other vessels on the 15th of May. Commodore Tatnall was tried by court-marshal for destroying the Virginia, and was honorably acquitted
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
ired damages—put on a new steel prow, exchanged two of her guns for two others, and on May 8, more formidable than ever, again went out to attack the Federal fleet which had been reinforced by the Galena and Vanderbilt, and was bombarding the Confederate batteries, on the shore. On the approach of the Virginia the Monitor and all the rest of the fleet retired below Old Point beyond her reach and never again came out. The Virginia maintained this attitude of defiance and victory until May 11th, 1862, when Norfolk was evacuated by the Confederate forces and all stores and munitions of war not movable were destroyed, including the Virginia (Merrimac). These facts are attested by eye-witnesses and actors in these events of high authority, and are drawn from carefully prepared narratives and reports in the office of the Southern Historical Society in the capitol of Virginia. With high respect your obedient servant, Dabney H. Maury, Chairman Executive Committeee S. H S. Midshi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
ut an end to the bombardment, and we returned to our buoy. Norfolk was evacuated on the 10th of May. In order that the ship might be carried up the James river, we commenced to lighten her, but ceased on the pilots saying they could not take her up. Her shield was then out of water; we were not in fighting condition. We therefore ran her ashore in the bight of Craney Island, landed the crew, and set the vessel on fire. The magazine exploded about half-past 4 on the morning of the 11th of May, 1862. The crew arrived at Drewry's Bluff the next day, and assisted in defeating the Monitor, Galena, and other vessels on the 15th of May. Commodore Tatnall was tried by court-marshal for destroying the Virginia, and was honorably acquitted of all the charges. The court stated the facts, and their motives for acquitting him. Some of them are as follows: That after the evacuation of Norfolk, Westover on James river became the most suitable position for her to occupy; that while in the