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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 30 30 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 4 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for May 18th, 1862 AD or search for May 18th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
derates were much weaker. The retreat from Norfolk was caused by a panic which sometimes seizes upon people, and leads them to do things at the moment for which they rebuke themselves when they come to their senses. The re-occupation of Norfolk Navy Yard was a great convenience to the North Atlantic squadron, which had been obliged to send most of its vessels to Philadelphia and New York for repairs, and now the operations up the James River could be carried on more effectively. On May 18, 1862, Flag-officer Goldsborough reports to the Department an engagement which took place on the James River between some gun-boats under Commander John Rodgers and a heavy battery on Drury's Bluff (a high point commanding a long reach of the river). The vessels which attacked this stronghold were the iron-clad (so-called) Galena, Commander John Rodgers, the Monitor, Lieutenant W. N. Jeffers, and the unarmored steamers Aroostook, Port Royal and Naugatuck. These vessels moved up the James