Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May 31st, 1862 AD or search for May 31st, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
mory V., orderly sergeant and second lieutenant; killed below Richmond, 25th of June, 1862. Brown, John G., color sergeant and second lieutenant; captured at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864; was sent with the famous 600 Confederate officers to Morris Island, off South Carolina, under the so-called retaliation act; living. Updike, Abraham, elected second lieutenant in October, 1864; was captured at Fort Steadman, 25th of March, 1865; dead. Atwood, Luther, private, killed at Seven Pines, May 31, 1862. Atwood, Samuel, private, died in hospital, Richmond. Allen, John, private, wounded September 17, 1862, Sharpsburg (dead). Allen, Arch, private, wounded. Barbee, Joseph T., private, died in Richmond hospital, 1862. Barber, John S., private, wounded at Seven Pines. Baker, Lewis D., orderly sergeant, wounded (living). Bennett, John, private, killed at first battle of Manassas. Bennett, Henry, sharpshooter, captured at Fort Steadman (living). Bolen, Newton, private,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), From Manassas to Frazier's Farm. (search)
rattle of shingles and shower of daubing and debris woke us up, and when we started to decamp in a great hurry, Lieutenant Updyke said, wofully: I've lost my hat. Have you got a match? When I struck one, lo and behold! there was a large Newfoundland dog, which had served as our pillow, lying there dead; but we did not hold a post-mortem to ascertain the cause of his death, because another cannon-ball came shrieking close over our heads. My first close call was at Seven Pines, the 31st of May, 1862, when we were going into the fight and wending our way through that impenetrable swamp and abattis, sluiced with water after a big rain. I was following in the wake of Corporal G. W. Fox, a file closer, it being my position in line of battle as lieutenant. When Fox was stepping around a tree he hesitated to push some briers to one side, and after I stepped with my right foot forward, I withdrew it and pushed by the other side of the tree, instead of waiting for him to get out of my wa