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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 301 301 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 24 24 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 23 23 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 16 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for June, 1862 AD or search for June, 1862 AD in all documents.

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ost without friction, and for a time he was permitted to be with his wife and children, who were exiles from the confiscated estate of Arlington. He prepared men and supplies to oppose McClellan's advance toward Richmond, and successfully resisted Joe Johnston's plan to withdraw troops from the South and risk all on a pitched battle with McClellan near the capital. When, later, Johnston was wounded at Seven Pines, the command of the Confederate army on the Chickahominy devolved upon Lee (June, 1862) and he was at last in a position to make a full display of his genius as a strategist and an offensive fighter. He at once decided, against the opinions of most of his officers, not to fall back nearer Richmond, and, after sending J. E. B. Stuart on a scouting circuit of the Union army, he prepared for the offensive. The attack made on June 26th failed because Stonewall Jackson's fatigued soldiers, who All the original war-time photographs of Robert E. Lee: as presented in this
John McAllister Schofield, commander of the Army of the Frontier and of the Department and Army of the Ohio. John Pope, commander of the Army of Virginia, June to September, 1862, including Second Bull Run. Don Carlos Buell, commander of the Army of the Ohio in the Shiloh campaign and afterward of a Department. Willievelopment of the West. When the Civil War broke out, Pope was sent to Cairo, Illinois, and later to command the troops in northern Missouri. From February to June, 1862, he headed the newly created Army of the Mississippi, during which time he was made major-general of volunteers and brigadier-general of the regular army. His brigadier-general of volunteers, he was conspicuous for his bravery at Pea Ridge, and as major-general of volunteers was placed in command of Harper's Ferry in June, 1862. Then he served in the Army of Virginia, in command of its First Corps, out of which the Eleventh Corps, Army of the Potomac, was created. He relinquished the
exploits won him much renown. Among his famous deeds were the ride around McClellan's army in June, 1862; the dash on Pope's headquarters at Catlett's Station, Virginia, and the raid on Manassas Juncrch 18, 1862. He was in command at Fort Pillow at the time of FlagOfficer Davis's attack, May-June, 1862, and commanded a brigade at the battle of Corinth, October 4th. He died at Port Hudson, Louisd, he had a division in the Army of the West, and was temporarily at the head of that force in June, 1862. He was placed in command of the Department of East Tennessee in September. Subsequently, heh, 1861, to enter the Confederate service as colonel of the Sixth North Carolina Infantry. In June, 1862, he became brigadier-general and was made major-general in May, 1863. He was brigade and divieral. He had a division in the Army of the West, and commanded the whole force temporarily in June, 1862. As major-general, he had a division with Pemberton's forces in the battle with Sherman at Ch