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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 301 301 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 24 24 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 23 23 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 16 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for June, 1862 AD or search for June, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
or him the Brigadier's wreath and stars just as he yielded up his brave young life at. Bethesda church, in June, 1864. With such leaders, and the splendid material which composed our regiment, it soon become the pride of its officers and the glory of its humblest private soldier. It was my privilege, while at Harper's Ferry, to see occasionally Captain Turner Ashby, whose raven locks and soldierly bearing even then attracted attention, and whose name had become famous when he fell in June, 1862, as Brigadier-General of cavalry, but gallantly leading an infantry charge. I saw here also Colonel J. E. B. Stuart, who afterwards became the idol of the army, Colonel E. Kirby Smith, who was to surrender, as General commanding, the trans-Mississippi Department, Major Whiting, who was to win his wreath and stars and imperishable glory for his brave defense of Wilmington, and a number of others who are not unknown to fame. General Johnston at once won the confidence and enthusiastic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official statement of the strength of the Federal armies during the war. (search)
Territory and the District of Columbia, from April 15, 1861, to the close of the war. From this statement we learn that under the call of April 15, 1861, for 75,000 three months militia, the States furnished 91,816. Under the call of May 3, 1861, (confirmed by act approved August 6, 1861), and under acts of July 22 and 25, 1861, for 500,000 three years men, 700,680 men were actually furnished, of whom, however, only 657,868 were three years men; while 15,007 men were furnished in May and June, 1862, by special authority, for three months. Under the call of July, 2, 1862, for 300,000 men for three years, 421,465 were furnished. Under the call of August 4, 1862, for 300,000 militia for nine months, only 87,588 were furnished. Under the President's proclamation of June 15, 1863, for militia of six months, 16,361 men were furnished. Under the call of October 17, 1863, (which embraces men raised by draft of 1863), and that of February 1, 1864, for 500,000 men for three years, 317,092 m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign of General E. Kirby Smith in Kentucky, in 1862. (search)
rostrated by a terribly broken limb, and, much to his mortification, so utterly disabled as to be unable to take part in the impending movements, I received an invitation to act as a volunteer on that staff. I had seen some service with the army of Mississippi upon the staff of General John C. Breckinridge. Depleted by disease, caused mainly by the want of water, which a little foresight should have provided, that army, as it is well known, was forced to retreat in the latter days of June, 1862, from Corinth all the way to Tupelo, and it was generally understood that no serious operations were likely to transpire in that quarter during the ensuing summer. The greatest necessity of a soldier, said Napoleon to O'Meara, is water, of which a true history of the Confederate army at Corinth would furnish a sad and disastrous illustration. Delayed by a severe attack of fever, I did not reach Knoxville until the 15th of August. General Smith had already left to place himself at the h