hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 29 29 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 18 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 6 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 5 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for June 3rd, 1862 AD or search for June 3rd, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

l. Miller had his regiment at an aim, and now recovered arms. The enemy instantly poured in a deadly volley, by which Miller was killed. The left wing of the Eighty-first poured in their fire, by which that regiment fell in piles. The Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel, Major, and Adjutant all fell; the balance of the regiment fell and broke. Yours truly, I. B. Richardson, Brig.-General Commanding Division. General McClellan to his army. McClellan's headquarters, Tuesday Evening, June 3, 1862. The following address was read to the army this evening at dress-parade, and was received with an outburst of vociferous cheering from every regiment: headquarters army of the Potomac, camp near New-Bridge, Va., June 2, 1862. Soldiers of the Army of the Potomac! I have fulfilled at least a part of my promise to you. You are now face to face with the rebels, who are held at bay in front of their capital. The final and decisive battle is at hand. Unless you belie your past h
Doc. 53.-Fremont's pursuit of Jackson. New-York Tribune account. Fremont's headquarters, Mount Jackson, Va., June 3, 1862. Gen. Fremont left Franklin on Sunday, May twenty-fifth. His troops were exhausted by previous forced marches to relieve Schenck and Milroy, from which they had not had time to recruit, and were weak from want of food. The first seven miles of road were only just not absolutely impassable by wagons. It was just such a road as cannot be found in the East, nor where an army has not passed. Wounded and sick were left at Franklin, because an attempt to carry them would have killed them. Nevertheless, with all its train of wagons, the army marched fifteen miles the first day. The next it reached Petersburgh, thirty miles from Franklin, at noon, and halted till Tuesday morning. Orders were then issued that knapsacks, tents, and baggage of every description that could possibly be dispensed with should be left behind. The knapsacks were stored in houses