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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 22 22 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for June 6th, 1862 AD or search for June 6th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
ay in the following order: Flagship Benton, Lieut.-Com. Phelps; Louisville, Com. B. M. Dove; Carondelet. Corn. H. Walke; Cairo, Lieut.-Com. N. E. Bryant; St. Louis, Lieut.-Corn. Nelson McGunnegle. They dropped down the river according to signal, and prepared for battle. The Confederate gun-boats opened fire upon our fleet as it moved down. with the seeming intention of having the city injured by the return fire; but due care was taken in regard Action of the gun-boats at Memphis, June 6 1862. to this matter, and shot and shell were sent among the Confederates with good effect. At this moment the ram fleet was several miles up the river, though coming down rapidly, and it was necessary for our gunboats to maneuver so as to enable it to overtake them. The Confederate vessels (still under the command of Montgomery) were the rams General Van Dorn, General Price, General Lovell, General Beauregard and General Jeff Thompson, mounting each four heavy guns; the General Bragg a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
basis of the published programme of April 20th, never carried out; the formation and position of the attacking force being therefore entirely misunderstood by the historians. One (Rev. Mr. Boynton's) history not even mentioning me, although it did those of officers commanding vessels under me. My name was merely inserted (as commanding a division) at the instance of a friend, who discovered the omission too late to make a further correction. The resolution of the United States Senate of June 6, 1862, and accompanying documents, of which two thousand were printed, perpetuates the error of our passing the forts in two columns abreast. Mr. Greeley in his American conflict, and other authors, are led into the same misstatements. Lossing's Pictorial history erroneously describes the Cayuga as retiring from the fight on account of her damages, whereas she was continually in action notwithstanding she was much cut up with forty-two shot holes. The Varuna, which had passed us while heavil