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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 40 40 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 21 21 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 8 8 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 6 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 4 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 4 4 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Seacoast defences of South Carolina and Georgia. (search)
he system that the defence was crowned by an evacuation of Battery Wagner and of Morris' Island, which has no parallel in ancient or modern warfare for its skill. Moreover, the works on James' Island, which enabled Beauregard's small force on the 16th of July, 1863, to defeat so signally the strong column under General Terry, were parts of a wholly different system and of other description than those in existence upon the same island when the battle of Secessionville was fought on the 16th of June, 1862. A like radical difference characterized the arrangements made for the defence of John's Island, and aided General Wise to inflict a handsome defeat upon the strong Federal column which was pushed out by that way in February, 1864, to strike and break Beauregard's communications with Savannah, and occupy his attention pending the descent of General Seymour's powerful military and political expedition into Florida; and when that skill-fully planned expedition was brought to signal di
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strength of General Lee's army in the Seven days battles around Richmond. (search)
ia. By inquiring of him you will find that I am correct. From the Battle of Sharpsburg it was in the division commanded by me, and it never after that time reached 3,000 men. Drayton's brigade did not come to Virginia until after the battles around Richmond. It was composed of the Fifteenth South Carolina and the Fiftieth and Fifty-first Georgia regiments and Third South Carolina battalion. A part, if not all of it, was engaged in the fight at Secessionville, South Carolina, on the 16th of June, 1862. Its first engagement in Virginia was on the Rappahannock, the 25th of August, 1862. After Sharpsburg it was so small that it was distributed among some other brigades in Longstreet's corps. In a roster of Longstreet's corps, published in the Banner of the South, by General Alexander, the history of the regiments composing Drayton's brigade is given. Coming to Virginia after the Seven Days Battles it. of course, had no effect in increasing General Lee's numbers at these battles. T
he had 5,000 men and three guns. The pickets have disappeared from around us. The servant we sent for Mr. C. says that General S. burnt the encampment near the Old Church, on Saturday evening, killed many horses, and severely wounded a captain, who refused to surrender; the men scampered into the woods. He represents the Yankees as very much infuriated, vowing vengeance upon our people, from which we hope that they have been badly used. We feel intensely anxious about our brigade. June 16th, 1862. Yesterday we sent letters to the Court-House to be mailed, presuming, as we had not seen an enemy for twenty-four hours, that the coast would be clear for awhile; but Bartlett rode into a detachment of them in Taliaferro's Lane. The poor old man, in his anxiety to save his letters, betrayed himself by putting his hand on his pocket. They were, of course, taken from him. [The letters I mentioned as having been published in the New York papers.] They are heartily welcome to mine; I
June 16th, 1862. Yesterday we sent letters to the Court-House to be mailed, presuming, as we had not seen an enemy for twenty-four hours, that the coast would be clear for awhile; but Bartlett rode into a detachment of them in Taliaferro's Lane. The poor old man, in his anxiety to save his letters, betrayed himself by putting his hand on his pocket. They were, of course, taken from him. [The letters I mentioned as having been published in the New York papers.] They are heartily welcome to mine; I hope the perusal may do them good, but C. is annoyed. It was the first letter she had written to her husband since the depredations at W., and she had expressed herself very freely.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
es, drawings, and carefully prepared maps annexed to it are interesting and instructive. The description he gives of the city of Charleston, and of the fortifications in and around its harbor, is exact. But the inference to be drawn from the paragraph numbered nineteen in the book [p. 11] is exceptionable. It reads as follows: The strength of the James Island works was tested by a bold but unsuccessful assault upon them by our forces under Brigadier-General [H. W.] Benham on the 16th of June, 1862. I deem it necessary to place the facts of this attack in their proper light, because that is the reason assigned by Gillmore for not having attacked by James Island in July, 1863, when he attempted the Morris Island route. The truth of the matter is, that the point attacked by Generals Benham and I. I. Stevens near Secessionville The assault at Secessionville was made by Stevens's division of about 3500 men, supported by General H. G. Wright's division, numbering 3100. Wrig
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
of the defense, recently stated that he had under his control 385 pieces of artillery of all calibers, including field-batteries, and an ample force of skilled men to serve them. When the position was evacuated by the Confederates, February 18th, 1865, 246 guns were left behind in the several works. The James Island defenses were especially strong. They had repulsed a bold and spirited assault upon them from the Stono River side, made by forces under General H. W. Benham, on the 16th of June, 1862, and had been greatly strengthened since that time. A gallant and well-directed attack upon Fort Sumter on April 7th, 1863, by a squadron composed of nine iron-clad vessels, under command of Rear-Admiral Du Pont, had signally failed, after a sharp engagement lasting about one hour. [See p. 32.] The squadron carried 15-inch and 1-inch shell guns and 150-pounder Parrott rifles. Five of the iron-clads were reported by their respective commanders to be wholly or partly disabled in the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
y and Navy, and garrisoned at once by the Indiana Brigade under Colonel Fitch. A great deal of property fell into the hands of the Federal troops, who kept possession of the place until the end of the war, and soon converted it into a loyal city. The Confederates had now to seek a new strategic line of defence : they established their fifth Gibraltar at Vicksburg, where the gunboats will catch up with them after a while. Expedition against St. Charles, on the White River. On June 16th, 1862, Rear-Admiral Davis sent an expedition up the White River to destroy some batteries located at St. Charles. The expedition was under the charge of Com. Kilty. and was composed of the gun-boats Mound City, St. Louis, Lexington, and Conestoga, and several transports with troops under Col. Fitch, U. S. A. The Confederates had mounted batteries at this point and had obstructed the river with piles and sunken vessels. On June 17th, Com. Kilty reconnoitered the place in a tug, and hav
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
nt that has served us so long and so well. For particulars more in detail I may respectfully refer to the reports of the regimental commanders. I have the honor to be, your most obedient servant, Wm. Grose, Colonel, Commanding Nineteenth Brigade. Capt. J. M. Kendrick, Assistant Adjutant-General. No. 11.-report of Liet. Col. William H. Blake, Ninth Indiana Infantry, of operations from May 3 to 30. Hdqrs. 9TH Indiana Vols., camp 4TH Div., Army Ohio, Near Iuka, Miss., June 16, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report that, in compliance with orders, my regiment marched from the camp on the field of Shiloh, with camp and garrison equipage, on the Corinth road, and encamped 10 miles distant. The regiment was thrown forward to the front 1 mile in advance on picket duty. On the morning of May 3 moved forward on the Corinth road, with the brigade in column of assault, covering a working party constructing a bridge 3 miles in advance, returning to camp on the same d
anche, a wealthy and eminent sugar-planter just above New Orleans--(who, it appears, being vexed by military interference with the police of his plantation, had driven off all his negroes, telling them to go to their friends, the Yankees)--had involved himself in a difference with his superior, by harboring and protecting those and other fugitives, contrary to the policy of the Government, which Gen. Butler was endeavoring, so far as possible, to conform to, Gen. Phelps, in his report June 16, 1862. to Gen. Butler's Adjutant, justifying his conduct in the premises — after setting forth the impossibility of putting down the Rebellion and at the same time upholding its parent, Slavery, and the absolute necessity of adopting a decided anti-Slavery policy — says: The enfranchisement of the people of Europe has been, and is still, going on, through the instrumentality of military service ; and by this means our slaves might be raised in the scale of civilization and prepared for fre
S. C. Remaining at Hilton Head and its vicinity, the regiment was not under fire until the affair at Secessionville, June 16, 1862, where, under command of Colonel Jackson, it established a reputation for gallantry and efficiency. It took 623 offi battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Williamsburg, Va. 42 Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 7 Fair Oaks, Va., June 16, 1862 1 Petersburg Trenches, Va. 4 Glendale, Va. 2 Picket Line, Petersburg 7 Kettle Run, Va., Aug. 27, 1862 2 Deep Bo Md. 1 Petersburg, Va. 6 Marye's Heights, Va. 3 Sailor's Creek, Va. 18 Rappahannock Station, Va. 5 Picket, Va., June 16, 1862 1 Wilderness, Va. 12     Present, also, at Savage Station; White Oak Swamp; Malvern Hill; Crampton's Gap; Frd with Sherman's Expedition for Hilton Head, S. C. In the assault on the earthworks at Secessionville (James Island), June 16, 1862, the regiment signally distinguished itself. The brigade — in Stevens's Division — was commanded in that action by
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