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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 328 328 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 6 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 5 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for June 27th, 1862 AD or search for June 27th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
y, and that fair-haired, rosy-cheeked boy, mother's darling, of April, 1861—now a bronzed veteran of the Army of Northern Virginia, who has followed the stars and bars on many a victorious field—returns to his boyhood's home. But he comes not back with light, elastic step and erect carriage as when he marched forth so gayly at his country's call. He is borne on a litter—he has been shot through the lungs, his life-tide is ebbing away, and he has come home to die. On that memorable 27th day of June, 1862, at Cold Harbor, when Stonewall Jackson issued his crisp order, Tell General Ewell to sweep the field with the bayonet, and our whole line pressed grandly forward, carried every position before it, and persuaded General McClellan that it was indeed time to change base from before Richmond to the shelter of his gun-boats at Harrison's Landing, our youthful hero fell in the very forefront of the battle in one of the most splendid charges of the famous old Thirteenth Virginia Infantry. <
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 2: influence of Christian officers. (search)
hem down as priceless heirlooms. (I saw one of these books several years ago in the hands of a son whose father was killed on the retreat. It was not for sale. Indeed, money could not buy it.) General Lee's orders and reports always gratefully recognized the Lord of Hosts as the Giver of victory, and expressed an humble dependence upon and trust in Him. He thus began his dispatch to the President the evening of his great victory at Cold Harbor and Gaines's Mill. Headquarters, June 27, 1862. His Excellency, President Davis: Mr. President: Profoundly grateful to Almighty God for the signal victory granted to us, it is my pleasing task to announce to you the success achieved by this army to-day. His beautiful general order of congratulation to the troops on their series of splendid victories during the seven days battles opened with these memorable words: General order no. 75. Headquarters in the field, July 7, 1862. The commanding general, profoundly grateful
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 8: eagerness of the soldiers to hear the Gospel. (search)
and on the march we had frequent seasons of worship. I preached in a grove near Louisa Court House, and again at Ashland, I well remember, to deeply interested congregations, and as I mingled among our wounded at Cold Harbor (where on the 27th of June, 1862, my regiment, the Thirteenth Virginia, carried into action 306 men and lost 175, killed and wounded), I found a number who referred to those meetings and expressed themselves as deeply affected by them. Rev. Dr. R. L. Dabney was a gallanes. I preached four times that day to very large and deeply solemn congregations. The service at sundown was especially impressive. It was held on the very ground over which the grand charge of the Confederates was made on the memorable 27th of June, 1862, and was attended by an immense crowd. It was a beautiful Sabbath eve, and all nature seemed to invite to peace and repose. But the firing of the pickets in front—the long rows of stacked muskets—the tattered battle-flags which rippled in
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
me to pass by altogether other illustrations of the genuineness of these revivals, and to cull only a few of the hundreds of incidents I have, showing how these men met the king of terrors. A noble fellow who fell at Gaines's Mill, the 27th of June, 1862, said to comrades who offered to bear him to the rear: No! I die. Tell my parents I die happy. On! on to victory! Jesus is with me, and will give me all the help I need. John Anderson, of Company C, Thirteenth Virginia Regiment, who wds. That chapter was a great favorite with my dear mother, and she used frequently to read it to me when I was a boy. I know its meaning now. Yes! and I will soon meet her, and dear Ed. A younger brother, who had fallen at Gaines's Mill, June 27, 1862. too, in one of those bright mansions which Jesus went to prepare for us. Thus on the 2d day of September, 1863, Francis Pendleton Jones passed from the earth. The death of Lieutenant William Fauntleroy Cocke, of Cumberland county, Virgin