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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 114 114 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 67 67 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 41 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 9 9 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for July 1st, 1862 AD or search for July 1st, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 9 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Income-tax. (search)
Income-tax. The first income-tax was enacted by Congress July 1, 1862, to take effect in 1863. It taxed all income over $600 and under $10,000 3 per cent., and over $10,000 5 per cent. By the act of March 3, 1865, the rate was increased to a and to 10 per cent. on the excess over $5,000, the exemption of $600 remaining the same. On March 2, 1867, the exemption was increased to $1,000, and the rate fixed at 5 per cent. on all excess above $1,000; the tax to be levied only until 1870. After a contest in Congress the tax was renewed for one year only by act of July 14, 1870, at the reduce rate of 2 1/2 per cent. on the excess of income above $2,000. A bill to repeal it passed the Senate Jan. 26, 1871, by 26 to 25. The House refused to take up the Senate bill Feb. 9, 1871, by a vote of 104 to 105, but on March 3, 1871, concurred in the report of a committee which endorsed the Senate bill and repealed the tax. The last tax levied under the law was in 1871. Income-taxes assessed a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Internal improvements. (search)
r this purpose there were given each alternate section of land, designated by odd numbers, for six sections in width on each side of said road. This act was repealed in August following. At various times in 1856 grants of land for similar purposes were made to the States of Iowa, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Mississippi. On March 3, 1856, a grant was made to Minnesota. All of these grants made in 1856 and 1857 were similar to that given to Missouri in 1852. July 1, 1862, the Union Pacific Railroad Company was created for the purpose of constructing and maintaining a railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean. They were granted the right of way through the public lands to the extent of 200 feet in width on each side of the line of the road, together with the necessary ground for stations, buildings, etc. They were also granted in aid of the construction of the road every alternate section of public land to the amount of five
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Malvern Hill, battle of. (search)
Malvern Hill, battle of. Malvern Hill forms a high and dry plateau sloping towards Richmond from bold banks on the James River, and bounded by deep ravines that made it an excellent defensive position. Upon that plateau the Army of the Potomac was posted, July 1, 1862, under the direction of General Barnard. Gen. Fitz-John Porter had reached that point the day before, and placed his troops so as to command all approaches to it from Richmond or the White Oak Swamp. They were within reach of National gunboats on the James River that might prove very efficient in any battle there. The last of the Confederate trains and artillery arrived there at 4 P. M., and in that almost impregnable position preparations were made for battle. Yet General McClellan did not consider his army safe there, for it was too far separated from his supplies; so, on the morning of July 1, he went on the Galena to seek for an eligible place for a base of supplies, and for an encampment for the army. Duri
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, State of. (search)
some person wearing the uniform of a Maryland soldier. To add to the foregoing, an assemblage elected in defiance of law, but claiming to be the legislative body of your State, and so recognized by the executive of Maryland, was debating the federal compact. If all this be not rebellion, I know not what to call it. I certainly regard it as sufficient legal cause for suspending the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus. At the request of the governors of many States the President, on July 1, 1862, called for 300,000 volunteers to serve during the war; and in August he called for 300,000 more for three months, with the understanding that an equal number would be drafted from the citizens who were between eighteen and forty-five years of age, if they did not appear among the volunteers. These calls were cheerfully responded to; and the Confederate government, alarmed, ordered General Lee to make a desperate effort to capture the national capital before the new army should be broug
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Peninsular campaign, (search)
29, 1862 Entire Army of the Potomac safely across White Oak Swamp on the morning ofJune 30, 1862 battle of Glendale (q. v.)June 30, 1862 Army of the Potomac, with its immense trains, concentrated on and around Malvern Hill on the morning ofJuly 1, 1862 battle of Malvern Hill (q. v.)July 1, 1862 President visits McClellan at Harrison's LandingJuly 7, 1862 Hooker reoccupies Malvern HillAug. 4, 1862 McClellan ordered to withdraw to Aquia CreekAug. 4, 1862 Harrison's Landing entirely vacate1862 battle of Glendale (q. v.)June 30, 1862 Army of the Potomac, with its immense trains, concentrated on and around Malvern Hill on the morning ofJuly 1, 1862 battle of Malvern Hill (q. v.)July 1, 1862 President visits McClellan at Harrison's LandingJuly 7, 1862 Hooker reoccupies Malvern HillAug. 4, 1862 McClellan ordered to withdraw to Aquia CreekAug. 4, 1862 Harrison's Landing entirely vacatedAug. 16, 1862 McClellan reaches Aquia CreekAug. 24, 1862 Reports at AlexandriaAug. 26, 1862
o support the government and to pay interest on the public debt, imposing taxes on spirits, ale, beer, and porter, licenses, manufactured articles and products, auction sales, yachts, billiard-tables, slaughtered cattle, sheep, and hogs, railroads, steamboats, ferry-boats, railroad bonds, banks, insurance companies, etc., salaries of officers in service of the United States, advertisements, incomes, legacies, business papers of all kinds, like bank-checks, conveyances, mortgages, etc......July 1, 1862 Act to increase internal revenue passed......March 7, 1864 Act of Aug. 5, 1861, repealed......June 30, 1864 Act passed to reduce internal taxation......July 13, 1866 Internal-revenue taxes reduced by acts of July 14, 1870, and June 6......1872 All special taxes imposed by law accruing after April 30, 1873, including taxes on stills, to be paid by stamps denoting the amount of tax, by act......Dec. 24, 1872 Internal-revenue tax on tobacco, snuff, and cigars increased, and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
the Mississippi and isolate Vicksburg......June 27, 1862 [General Grant recommenced work on this canal, Jan. 22, 1863, but it proved a failure.] Act for a railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean; approved July 1, 1862 Office of commissioner of internal revenue created......July 1, 1862 President Lincoln calls for 300,000 volunteers for three years......July 2, 1862 General McClellan's letter to President Lincoln from Harrison's Landing, Va., giviJuly 1, 1862 President Lincoln calls for 300,000 volunteers for three years......July 2, 1862 General McClellan's letter to President Lincoln from Harrison's Landing, Va., giving advice on the policy of the government......July 7, 1862 Major-General Halleck commander-in chief......July 11, 1862 By resolution Congress provides 2,000 medals of honor for distribution to non-commissioned officers and privates who shall distinguish themselves......July 12, 1862 Maj.-Gen. John Pope takes command of the Army of Virginia......July 14, 1862 Congress authorizes the enrolment of the militia between eighteen and forty-five; the appointment of a judge-advocate-general;
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nebraska, (search)
ka admitted by proclamation of President Johnson......March 1, 1867 A band of Indians wreck a freight train by placing obstructions on the track, and murder all the train hands. General Augur sends a detachment of troops, who engage 500 Sioux Indians in battle at Plum Creek, near Omaha......Aug. 16, 1867 Seat of government removed from Omaha to a point in Lancaster county named Lincoln, in honor of President Lincoln......1867 Union Pacific Railroad, chartered by act of Congress, July 1, 1862, is opened for traffic......May 10, 1869 Legislature ratifies the Fifteenth Amendment......Feb. 17, 1870 State board of three commissioners of immigration provided for by act of legislature......1870 Gov. David P. Butler impeached for corruption in office, in appropriating to his own use $17,000 of school fund......June 2, 1871 Omaha Daily bee established by Edward Rosewater at Omaha......1871 University of Nebraska, at Lincoln, chartered 1869, opened......1871 Nebraska
it to federal authority, issued April 6, is accepted by the Mormon leaders......June 2, 1858 Van of the army of Utah finds Salt Lake City deserted; 30,000 Mormons had moved southward......June 26, 1858 Governor Cumming resigns and leaves Salt Lake City......May, 1861 Another convention meets, Jan. 20, finishes a constitution for the State of Deseret, Jan. 23, ratified by the people......March 3, 1862 Act of Congress passed to punish and prevent polygamy in the Territories......July 1, 1862 Mormon apostates, known as Morrisites, indicted for armed resistance to law, when summoned to surrender by the sheriff resist for three days—June 13-16, 1862—until their leader, Joseph Morris, and others are killed; tried before Judge Kinney, seven are convicted of murder in the second degree......March, 1863 Gov. James Duane Doty dies......June 13, 1865 University of Deseret at Salt Lake City, chartered 1850, organized......March 8, 1869 Gov. J. Wilson Shaffer by proclamation