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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 199 199 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 34 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 27 27 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 9 9 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for August, 1862 AD or search for August, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 1: introductory and explanatory. (search)
y this act of tardy justice Massachusetts was credited with twenty-two thousand three hundred and sixty men (22,360). See Volume I., pages 561-563. It is not surprising therefore that, in order to enlist our proportion of nine-months men in August, 1862, the bounties could not be diminished in proportion to the shortness of the term of service required. About one in fifteen of the entire population of the Commonwealth were already in either the military or naval service of the country, and nand add strength to the Union cause. Before the close of the year the number of men asked for by the President on each call had been enlisted, enrolled, assigned, and sent forward to the front. Previous to the President's calls of July and August, 1862, no fixed district or town system for recruiting men for the military service had been formed by either the Commonwealth or by the General Government, and no system of local credits had been arranged, by which we could tell how many men had en
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
regular legal town-meeting held on the 9th of March, the town voted to raise one thousand dollars towards paying part of the expense for volunteers. It was also— Voted, That the town approve of the course pursued by our selectmen last year, in offering bounties for volunteers for the military service of the United States, so as to fill up the quotas of this town, as made out by our State authorities, and in answer to each of the calls made by the President for volunteers in July and August, 1862. Voted, That the town assume the responsibilities of the selectmen for the expenses incurred by them in borrowing money to pay the aforesaid bounties; provided, the bounties paid to each volunteer actually accepted and sworn into service does not exceed one hundred dollars. Toted, That the present board of selectmen be instructed to renew, with interest, the notes given by the past board of selectmen for such borrowed money, or otherwise take such action as will secure the desired r
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
, was as follows: In 1861, $6,322.45; in 1862, $25,000.00; in 1863, $35,988.25; in 1864, $27,000.00; in 1865, $16,000.00. Total amount, $110,310.70. The ladies of Newburyport began to do soldiers' work early in the war, but it was not until August, 1862, that they were thoroughly organized into the Soldiers' Relief Association, of which Mrs. John C. March was made president. Their success was complete. At the close of the war they had furnished in articles and in money for the sick and wouneasurer of the Commonwealth, and to give a receipt in full. The city-treasurer's report, made in compliance with the above-named act, showed that the number of three-years men, under the two calls of the President in the months of July and August, 1862, to whom bounties were paid, was three hundred and eighty-six (386); number of nine-months men to whom bounties were paid, one hundred and sixty-two (162), making a total of five hundred and forty-eight (548). Amount of bounties paid to thr
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
, 1785. Population in 1860, 639; in 1865, 579. Valuation in 1860, $246,739; in 1865, $239,097. The selectmen during all the years of the war were Levi N. Campbell, Merritt Torrey, Samuel W. Lincoln, Albert Dyer, Merritt Jones, and Joseph Sears. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during the same period was Freeman Hamlin. There does not appear to have been any meeting held by the town during the year 1861 to consider matters relating to the war. Two meetings were held in July and August, 1862, and it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who would enlist to fill the quota of the town. The immediate effect of which was that three persons enlisted for three years, and eighteen for nine months service. The town continued to furnish her quotas all through the war. Plainfield furnished sixty-one men for the war, which was a surplus of seven over and above all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and ex
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
2; in 1862, $9,352.21; in 1863, $10,275.15; in 1864, $9,200.00; in 1865, $4,400.00. Total amount, $36,171.28. The Clinton Soldiers-Aid Society was formed in August, 1862, of which Mrs. C. G. Stevens, Mrs. J. F. Maynard, Mrs. J. M. Heard, and Mrs. C. F. Field were directors. A suitable room was procured, which was kept open eve.95; in 1863, $2,717.41; in 1864, $3,468.31; in 1865, $2,200.00. Total amount, $10,945.87. The Ladies' Aid Society of Southborough held weekly meetings from August, 1862, until the end of the war, and did a great deal of good Christian work for the soldiers. They sent forward to the army and to the hospitals 2,237 different ard. From the Globe Village (in Southbridge) we have a note written by Mary C. Hartshorn, from which we learn that a Soldiers-Aid Society was formed there in August, 1862, which sent money and other contributions to the soldiers to the amount of nearly twelve hundred dollars. We have a list of the articles which were sent. It