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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 24 24 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for August 1st, 1862 AD or search for August 1st, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
e any property belonging to citizens of the Confederacy which might be necessary or convenient for their several commands, without making any provision for compensation therefor. About the same time, and, doubtless, by the same authority, Generals Pope and Steinwehr issued their infamous orders, also referred to in our last report. All of these orders were so contrary to all the rules of civilized warfare, and especially to those adopted by the Federal authorities themselves, that on August 1st, 1862 (just ten days from the date of the cartel), the Confederate authorities were driven to the necessity of issuing an order declaring, among other things, that Pope and Steinwehr and the commissioned officers of their commands, had chosen for themselves (to use General Lee's words) the position of robbers and murderers, and not that of public enemies entitled, if captured, to be treated as prisoners of war. Later on, in the fall of that year, came the barbarous orders and conduct of Gene