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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 51 51 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 6th, 1862 AD or search for August 6th, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 6 document sections:

ommunication of General Breckinridge to Col. Cahill: headquarters confederate forces in the field, near Baton Rouge, August 6, 1862. To the Commanding Officer of the United States Forces, Baton Rouge, La.: I have sent Major De Bauer with a flag o Major-General Commanding. Col. Cahill replied as follows: headquarters United States forces, Baton Rouge, La., August 6, 1862. General: In reply to your communication of this morning, under a flag of truce, I have the honor to say that we ang Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, La. Commander Porter's report. U. S. Gunboat Essex, off Baton Rouge, August 6, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: On the evening of the fourth inst. I was informed by Gen. Williamdron, New-Orleans. Lieutenant Commanding Ransom's report. United States gunboat Kineo, off Baton Rouge, La., August 6, 1862. sir: I have to report that a vigorous attack was made upon our forces at this place yesterday morning, at about f
Rebel reports and narratives. General Breckinridge's report. Headquarters in the field, near Comite River, August 6, 1862. To the Officers and Soldiers under my Command: I desire to express to you briefly my sense of your gallant conduct in the late operations. Baton Rouge, from the character of the ground, could not be taken and held while the enemy commanded the river. Accordingly the Arkansas was to engage the gunboats and floating-battery, while you were to whip the enemy on land. Unfortunately the machinery of the Arkansas became so injured that she could not reach the scene of action. Your part of the work was nobly done. After marching all night through a country destitute of water, you attacked an enemy superior to you in numbers, admirably posted, and supported by the fire of their fleet, you forced them from their positions, taking prisoners and several flags; killing and wounding many; destroying most of their camps, and large quantities of public stores,
s of the enemy, is positively prohibited, except through the military authorities, and in the manner specified by military law; and any person concerned in writing or in carrying letters or messages in any other way, will be considered and treated as a spy within the lines of the United States army. By command of Major-Gen. Pope. Geo. D. Ruggles, Col. A. A.G., and Chief of Staff. Official: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Colonel and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, near Sperryville, Va., Aug. 6, 1862. General orders, No. 18.--Hereafter, in all marches of the army, no straggling, or lagging behind, will be allowed. Commanders of regiments will be held responsible that this order is observed, and they will march habitually in the rear of their regiments — company commanders in the rear of their respective companies. They will suffer no man of their command to fall behind them on any excuse, except by a written permit of the medical officer of the regiment, that they are too sick
s of the enemy, is positively prohibited, except through the military authorities, and in the manner specified by military law; and any person concerned in writing or in carrying letters or messages in any other way, will be considered and treated as a spy within the lines of the United States army. By command of Major-Gen. Pope. Geo. D. Ruggles, Col. A. A.G., and Chief of Staff. Official: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Colonel and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, near Sperryville, Va., Aug. 6, 1862. General orders, No. 18.--Hereafter, in all marches of the army, no straggling, or lagging behind, will be allowed. Commanders of regiments will be held responsible that this order is observed, and they will march habitually in the rear of their regiments — company commanders in the rear of their respective companies. They will suffer no man of their command to fall behind them on any excuse, except by a written permit of the medical officer of the regiment, that they are too sick
Doc. 171.-occupation of Malvern Hill, Va. New-York Tribune account. camp near Harrison's Landing, Wednesday morning, August 6, 1862. Hooker and Sedgwick repossessed Malvern Hills yesterday morning. They marched circuitously to the right, and approached in the rear of that position, having the enemy between them and the river. He may have been four thousand strong. The ball opened with artillery, both parties throwing spherical case; the enemy throwing more and making better practice than he usually does. His guns were numerous in proportion to his men. The duel began on Nelson's farm. Leaving that position, the enemy fell back two miles, to Malvern, and made a stand. Here the battle raged an hour, the gunboats participating; I do not think they were of any service, however. By an hour, the enemy was becoming silent. Soon after we advanced, not firing again. The bayonet was sufficient. The enemy did not stand an instant, nor fire a shot. He had already withdraw
Doc. 174.-War meeting at Washington, D C. Held August 6, 1862. President Lincoln's speech. fellow-citizens: I believe there is no precedent for my appearing before you on this occasion, [applause,] but it is also true that there is no precedent for your being here yourselves, [applause and laughter,] and I offer, in justification of myself and of you, that, upon examination, I have found nothing in the Constitution against. [Renewed applause.] I, however, have an impression that there are younger gentlemen who will entertain you better, [voices---No, no! None can do better than yourself. Go on! ] and better address your understanding than I will or could, and therefore I propose but to detain you a moment longer. [Cries--Go on! Tar and feather the rebels I ] I am very little inclined on any occasion to say any thing unless I hope to produce some good by it. [A voice--You do that; go on. ] The only thing I think of just now not likely to be better said by some one else