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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 254 254 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 61 61 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 31 31 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 21 21 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 30th, 1862 AD or search for August 30th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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ed this to duty as a fatigue force. The colored men did not shrink from this duty; they gladly performed it: but they desired the privilege of defending themselves, and the works their hands had made, with arms. Organized companies of them, armed and equipped at their own expense, tendered their services to aid in the defence of the city. But this privilege was denied them, and they cheerfully performed the duty assigned. The defeat of the national forces at Richmond, Kentucky, August thirtieth, 1862, opened the way for rebel invasion of that State to the Ohio River. There was no organized force to resist this; none to protect Cincinnati. Major-General Lewis Wallace, at that time in command of the city, promptly commenced the organization of a citizen force for the protection of the city. In the morning papers of Septemtember second, there appeared an order from him, declaring martial law, suspending business, and directing the citizens to assemble at designated places in ea