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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 629 629 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 33 33 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 16 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 9 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for September, 1862 AD or search for September, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
no eulogy, and even had Mr. Eads done no more in the cause of the Union, he would have been entitled to the thanks of the nation. Since then he has gone on executing great works, and his reputation as a civil engineer is world-wide. A ninth powerful vessel, the Essex, was afterward added to this formidable flotilla. She carried nine heavy guns, and though built in later fashion was not equal to the Benton. When Flag-officer Andrew H. Foote took command of the Western Flotilla in September, 1862, it consisted of these nine iron-clads (so-called), three wooden gunboats, the Taylor Lexington and Conestoga, which had been purchased and equipped by Commander John Rodgers, and thirty-eight mortars mounted on rafts. This service was of a somewhat anomalous character, since the gun-boats were under control of the army, and their accounts were under the supervision of the Quartermaster General. There was no navy yard at first where the vessels could be refitted or repaired, but Fla
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
n of the Confederate strongholds had been carried out with a judgment and success which entitled all concerned to the highest praise. In the latter part of September, 1862, a joint expedition of the Army and Navy was prepared to operate against Franklin, a small town on the Blackwater River. It was agreed between the military cnder Rear-Admiral L. M. Goldsborough. Commander A. Ludlow Case, captain of the fleet. Obtained from the Secretary's report of 1862, and Navy register of Sept. 1862. Steam-frigate Minnesota--Flag-ship. Commander, A. L. Case; Lieutenant-Commanders, E. C. Grafton and John Watters; Lieutenant, Adolphus Dexter; Midshipmanngineers, James Hamilton, C. E. Rainer and W. B. Whitmore. Steamer Zouave. Acting-Assistant Engineers, John Badgely and Isaac Buck. Note.--The above list of officers is necessarily incomplete and not strictly correct, from the fact that the Navy Register for September, 1862, does not furnish the information usually given.