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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 629 629 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 33 33 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 16 16 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 9 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for September, 1862 AD or search for September, 1862 AD in all documents.

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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
g — a long day's march to the west; and the only direct road thence to Manassas Junction was completely under the enemy's control. Winchester was obnoxious to neither objection, but, on the contrary, fulfilled the conditions desired better than any other point. The commanders on both sides, in the subsequent military operations in that region, seem to have appreciated its importance, and to have estimated its value as I did, except those who disposed the forces of the United States in September, 1862, when eleven thousand men, placed at Harper's Ferry as a garrison, were captured, almost without resistance, by General Lee's troops, coming from Maryland. My objections to Harper's Ferry as a position, and to the idea of making a garrison instead of an active force of the troops intrusted with the defense of that district, were expressed to the proper authorities in letters dated May 26th and 28th, and June 6th, and replied to by General Lee After Richmond became the seat of the C