hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 629 629 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 33 33 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 16 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 9 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for September, 1862 AD or search for September, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

r. The surgeon on the field of battle knew neither friend nor foe in his treatment of the wounded. On June 6, 1862, a week after the battles of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks, a general order was issued from Washington that surgeons should be considered non-combatants and not sent to prison. It was a result of Stonewall Jackson's previous action, and was accepted by Lee at Richmond on the 17th. When muskets and bayonets were turned into tent-poles Caring for the Antietam wounded in September, 1862, just after the bloodiest day of the war The pages of this volume tell little of war's pomp and pageantry. Their subject is, and must be, grim and terrible. Though prisoners of war were not criminals, but often men whose courage was their only fault, and though their detention must not be considered as deserved punishment, but as a military necessity, nevertheless all prisons are unlovely. The groans of men, one moment vigorous, the next shattered and broken, or the sight of stre
he bone had been sawn through, and while the patient was still under the influence of the anesthetic, the primary section furnishing the information that the bone had Caring for the wounded from the Mississippi to the Potomac In the upper photograph are soldiers convalescing at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from their wounds received on the Red River and Port Hudson expeditions, and below is Smith's farm near Keedysville, Maryland, close to where the battle of Antietam was fought in September, 1862. In the course of the day's fierce firing nearly twenty-five thousand men were killed and wounded. It covered a period of about twelve hours; few entrenchments or fortifications of any kind were used by either side. Dr. Bernard, surgeon of the One Hundred and Second New York, was made the chief of all the hospitals. One of the locations of his corps hospitals was on Smith's farm. In the background of the picture is a fine view of South Mountain. In the foreground the men are gathe
he bone had been sawn through, and while the patient was still under the influence of the anesthetic, the primary section furnishing the information that the bone had Caring for the wounded from the Mississippi to the Potomac In the upper photograph are soldiers convalescing at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from their wounds received on the Red River and Port Hudson expeditions, and below is Smith's farm near Keedysville, Maryland, close to where the battle of Antietam was fought in September, 1862. In the course of the day's fierce firing nearly twenty-five thousand men were killed and wounded. It covered a period of about twelve hours; few entrenchments or fortifications of any kind were used by either side. Dr. Bernard, surgeon of the One Hundred and Second New York, was made the chief of all the hospitals. One of the locations of his corps hospitals was on Smith's farm. In the background of the picture is a fine view of South Mountain. In the foreground the men are gathe