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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 11 11 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 11 11 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 4 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for September 3rd, 1862 AD or search for September 3rd, 1862 AD in all documents.

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pending business, and directing the citizens to assemble at designated places in each ward, for military organization. It was well understood that this order was not intended to, and did not, include colored citizens. Numbers of these, however, offered themselves for any service in which they might be useful. This offer was accepted; but before any arrangement had been made for their employment, before any order had been given them, or request made of them, on the morning of the third of September, 1862, the police, acting in concert, and in obedience to some common order, in a rude and violent manner arrested the colored men wherever found — in the streets, at their places of business, in their homes — and hurried them to a mule-pen on Plum street, and thence across the river to the fortifications; giving them no explanation of this conduct, and no opportunity to prepare for camp life. This unwonted and cruel procedure filled their minds and the minds of their families with alarm