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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 36 36 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 21 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 20 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for September 18th, 1862 AD or search for September 18th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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. Maj. E. M. Burbank and Lieut. George W. Orne of the 12th were mortally wounded. The battle of Antietam is guardedly characterized by Ropes as being a moderate success. The losses equalled those at Shiloh, and they fell largely on regiments almost wholly new. General McClellan admitted a loss of nearly twelve thousand five hundred, of whom more than two thousand were killed. Century War Book, II, 681. Our losses very heavy, especially in general officers. (McClellan to Halleck, Sept. 18, 1862. Official War Records, XIX (2), 322.) Of the Confederate dead, two thousand seven hundred were counted and buried on the field; and two thousand of their wounded were left there. Without the loss of a gun or a color, McClellan reported the capture of thirteen guns, thirty-nine battle flags and six thousand prisoners. To many Massachusetts regiments this was their first serious experience of war. Xvii. The Fredericksburg campaign. On Nov. 5, 1862, General McClellan was relieved f