hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 20 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for October 10th, 1862 AD or search for October 10th, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
vice rendered during the war by the alumni of the University of North Carolina. We have noted how completely they dominated the control of the State in 1861. We have seen that the representatives of the University of North Carolina in the Confederate Congress was fair, but not extraordinarily large. We now come to the officers in the field. The highest military rank held by a University man was that of Lieutenant-General. This was attained by Leonidas Polk under a commission dated Oct. 10, 1862. Gen. Polk was outranked in length of service only by Longstreet and Kirby-Smith. He had been made Major-General on June 25, 1861; he was the second person to attain this rank, and, of the 99 Major Generals in the service, was, with one exception, the only man to attain this position without passing through the preliminary grade of Brigadier. The University had one other son to attain the rank of Major General, Bryan Grimes, commissioned Feb. 23, 1865. Of Brigadier Generals she ha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
the commanding officers, as shown by their official reports made immediately after the battle: Jackson's Command,5,000 Longstreet's Command,6,812 D. H. Hill's Division,3,000 R. H. Anderson's Division,4,000 A. P. Hill's Division,3,400 McLaws' Division,2,893 J. G. Walker's Division,3,200 ——— Total effective infantry,28,305 The cavalry and artillery have been generally estimated at 8,000. They certainly did not exceed this. The returns of the Army of Northern Virginia for October 10th, 1862, shows an effective force of these two arms of the service of 7,870 men. The figures given above can be verified by reference to the official reports of the operations of the Army of Northern Virginia, published by authority of the Congress of the Confederate States and also contained in the records of the Union and Confederate armies. Series I, Vol. XIX, Part I. It is an abandonment of the argument to contend that the ranking officers in General Lee's army made their reports w<