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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 662 662 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 24 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 21 21 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 14 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for November, 1862 AD or search for November, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
arrative. He was always to be found where fighting was going on. There was another young officer in the North Atlantic squadron at this time, Lieutenant William B. Cushing, who made a name for himself by his total disregard of danger. He would undertake the most desperate adventures, where it seemed impossible for him to escape death or capture, yet he almost always managed to get off with credit to himself and with loss to the enemy. He commanded the small gun-boat Ellis, and in November, 1862, it struck him that he would enter New River Inlet, push up the river, sweep it clear of vessels, capture the town of Jacksonville or Onslow Courthouse, take the Wilmington mail and destroy any salt-works he could find on the banks. He expected to surprise the enemy on going up, and then fight his way out. Five miles from the mouth of the inlet he came in sight of a vessel bound out with a load of cotton and turpentine. The enemy set fire to her in order to prevent her falling into
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
to arrest the career of the cruiser that was attacking American commerce and driving its vessels to seek protection under the British flag. The English Ministry might well afford to ignore the occasional destruction of part of a British cargo, when they knew that the system pursued by Semmes was driving all merchants to ship their cargoes in British bottoms, or to register their vessels under the English flag. The Chamber of Commerce, in Liverpool, writing to Earl Russell, as late as November, 1862. in regard to the destruction of neutral goods by the Alabama, received the reply: British owners of property on board of Federal ships, alleged to have been unlawfully captured by Confederate cruisers, are in the same position as any other neutral owner shipping in enemy's bottoms during the war. Of course, this drove all British property to seek neutral bottoms; and when English owners of captured property were told to apply to the Confederate prize-courts for redress, it convinced e