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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 662 662 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 24 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 21 21 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 14 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for November, 1862 AD or search for November, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 24 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arnold, Richard, 1828- (search)
Arnold, Richard, 1828- Military officer; born in Providence, R. I., April 12, 1828; was graduated at West Point in 1850. He served in Florida, California, at the battle of Bull Run, on the Peninsula, and was made chief of artillery of Banks's expedition in November, 1862. At Port Hudson and in the Red River campaign he rendered important service; also in the capture of Fort Fisher, and of Fort Morgan, near Mobile. He was brevetted major-general United States army in 1866. He died on Governor's Island, New York, Nov. 8, 1882.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Auger, Christorpher Colon, 1821-1898 (search)
Auger, Christorpher Colon, 1821-1898 Military officer; born in New York July 10, 1821; was graduated at West Point in 1843. He served as aide-de-camp to Generals Hopping and Cushing in the war with Mexico, and in 1861 was made a brigadiergeneral of volunteers, after serving under McDowell. He took command of a division under Banks. and was wounded at the battle of Cedar Mountain, Aug. 9, 1862; the same month he was made major-general of volunteers. In November, 1862, he. reported to General Banks for service in a Southern expedition, and was very active in the siege and capture of Port Hudson. From October, 1863, to August, 1866, he had command of the Department of Washington. and in 1867 he was assigned to the Department of the Platte. In 1869 he was made brigadier-general U. S. A., and in 188,5 was retired. He died in Washington, D. C., Jan. 16. 1898.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bartlett, William Francis, 1840-1876 (search)
Bartlett, William Francis, 1840-1876 Military officer; born in Haverhill, Mass., Jan. 6, 1840; was graduated at Harvard in 1862. He entered the volunteer army as captain in the summer of 1861; was engaged in the battle of Ball's Bluff (q. v.), and lost a leg in the siege of Yorktown in 1862. He was made colonel of a Massachusetts regiment in November, 1862, and took part in the capture of Port Hudson in 1863. In the siege of Petersburg (1864) he commanded a division of the 9th Corps, and at the explosion of the mine there he was made prisoner, but exchanged in September. In 1865 he was brevetted major-general of volunteers. He died in Pittsfield, Mass., Dec. 17, 1876.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carrington, Henry Beebee 1824- (search)
Carrington, Henry Beebee 1824- Military officer; born in Wallingford, Conn., March 2, 1824; graduated at Yale College in 1845. When the first call for troops was issued at the beginning of the Civil War he raised nine regiments of militia in western Virginia for three-months' volunteers; was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers in November, 1862; and served throughout the war with distinction. In 1870-73 he held the chair of Military Science and Tactics at Wabash College, Ind. His publications include American classics, or incidents of Revolutionary suffering; Crisis thoughts; Absa-ra-ka, land of massacre, and Indian operations on the Plains; Battles of the American Revolution; Battle-maps and charts of the American Revolution; Patriotic reader, or human liberty developed; Columbian selections; Beacon lights of patriotism; The Washington obelisk and its voices; Washington, the soldier; Lafayette and American Independence, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Doubleday, Abner, 1819-1893 (search)
55; and served against the Seminole Indians in 1856-58. Captain Doubleday was an efficient officer in Fort Sumter with Major Anderson during the siege. He fired the first gun (April 12, 1861) upon the Confederates from that fort. On May 14 he was promoted to major, and on Feb. 3, 1862, to brigadier-general of volunteers. In Looker's corps, at the battle of Antietam, he commanded a division; and when Reynolds fell at Gettysburg, Doubleday took command of his corps. He had been made major-general in November, 1862, and had been conspicuously engaged in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. He was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general of the United States army in March, 1865; was commissioned colonel of the 35th Infantry in September, 1867; and was retired in December, 1873. He died in Mendham, N. J., Jan. 26, 1893. General Doubleday was author of Reminiscences of forts Sumter and Moultrie in 1860-61; Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and other military works.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hancock, Winfield Scott 1824- (search)
infield Scott 1824- Military officer; born in Montgomery Square, Montgomery co., Pa., Feb. 14, 1824; graduated at West Point in 1844: served in the war with Mexico; and left that country Winfield Scott Hancock. quartermaster of his regiment. In September, 1861, he was made brigadier-general of volunteers, and served in the campaign on the Virginia peninsula in 1862. He was distinguished in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam. Having been made major-general of volunteers in November, 1862, he led a division at Fredericksburg in December; also at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, in 1863. Placed in command of the 2d Army Corps, he led it in the campaign of the Army of the Potomac in 1864-65. In August, 1865, he was made a brigadier-general in the United States army, and in 1866 was brevetted major-general. He was in command of different military departments after the war; and was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for the Presidency of the United States in 1880, when
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Heckman, Charles Adam 1822-1896 (search)
Heckman, Charles Adam 1822-1896 Military officer; born in Easton, Pa., Dec. 3, 1822; received an academic education; served through the Mexican and Civil wars; promoted brigadiergeneral of volunteers in November, 1862. On May 16, 1864, after he had repulsed a superior force of the enemy five times, he was captured, with his brigade, at Drury's Bluff, Va.; was a prisoner at Libby, Macon, Ga., and at Charleston, where he was one of the officers exposed to the fire of the National guns. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 14, 1896.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Herron, Francis Jay 1837- (search)
Herron, Francis Jay 1837- Military officer; born in Pittsburg, Pa., Feb. 17, 1837; graduated at the Western University of Pennsylvania in 1853; entered the Union army as a captain in the 1st Iowa Volunteers in 1861. He was in the battle of Wilson's Creek; and in the battle of Pea Ridge, he commanded the 9th Iowa Regiment, which he had raised, and of which he was lieutenant-colonel. In July, 1862, he was promoted to brigadier-general, and distinguished himself in Arkansas. In November, 1862, he was made a majorgeneral; and in 1863 took part in the capture of Vicksburg. He was with General Banks afterwards in his operations in Louisiana. After the war he practised law in New Orleans, and became United States marshal for Louisiana, and Secretary of State.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
1862 an expedition under General Butler and Admiral Farragut captured all the defences on the Mississippi below New Orleans, and took possession of the city. The State became the theatre of stormy events during the Civil War. On Dec. 4, 1862, two congressional districts, under the control of National troops, were permitted to elect delegates to Congress, and Benjamin F. Flanders and Michael Hahn were chosen and took their seats. Local courts were organized under military rule, and in November, 1862, a provisional court for the State was organized by the President. In April, 1863, he appointed judges of the Supreme Court. Late in 1863 an election of State officers was held in a portion of Louisiana. Michael Hahn was elected governor and inaugurated March 4, 1864, and on the 15th was made military governor likewise. In April a convention adopted a constitution abolishing slavery and providing for the education of both races, which was ratified in September, when five Congressmen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mower, Joseph Anthony 1827-1870 (search)
Mower, Joseph Anthony 1827-1870 Military officer; born in Woodstock, Vt., Aug. 22, 1827; was a private in an engineer company in the Mexican War, and entered the United States army as lieutenant in 1855. He was made captain in 1861, and was prominent in the battle of Island number ten (q. v.). He was conspicuous at other places; was promoted brigadiergeneral of volunteers in November, 1862; commanded a brigade in front of Vicksburg in 1863; and a division under Banks in the Red River expedition in 1864; promoted major-general of volunteers in August, 1864, and was placed in command of the 20th Corps. In July, 1866, he was commissioned colonel in the United States army, and was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general in the same. He died in New Orleans, La., Jan. 6, 1870.
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