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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 662 662 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 24 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 21 21 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 14 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for November, 1862 AD or search for November, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the war on the Rapidan. (search)
armies were about to measure strength had long since been examined by both parties; the river behind which Burnside had so unfortunately stationed himself in November, 1862, still separated those two armies; the Federals had tried in vain to cross it at Fredericksburg and above and below that city; as we have already stated, thei the entrance of three great rivers, within reach of railways of great importance to the Confederacy, he had shown, by his expedition against Goldsborough in November, 1862, that his presence was not an idle threat. The Federal navy kept up a connection between the various stations of the land-forces, protected them in case ofng a boat which had escaped the disaster gave an explanation of the affair. In the preceding volume we left the Confederate privateer Alabama at the end of November, 1862, slipping away from the Federal sloop-of-war San Jacinto, which had tried to blockade her in the port of St. Pierre, Martinique. The Secretary of the Navy at
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Pennsylvania. (search)
what were the military resources and the organization of the forces at the disposal of the government at Washington after two years of war. In the month of November, 1862, the Federal army numbered 775,336 men armed and equipped, and in December the Secretary of War, in his report to Congress, estimated their number at more thaon. A statement of the materiel on hand in each body has to be furnished monthly by each brigade and regiment, and in every quarter by each company. Now, in November, 1862, there were 300 brigades, 1000 regiments, and 10,000 companies, which makes 55,600 accounts to verify for this year; in 1863 each company commander has to furdy the chief abuses caused by ignorance or the inexperience of beginners. Consequently, at the end of the second year many improvements may be noticed. In November, 1862, there were 151 general hospitals, capable of accommodating 58,715 sick and wounded; the total number of the latter, both in the general and field hospitals,