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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 543 543 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 24 24 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 23 23 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 14 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for December, 1862 AD or search for December, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 22: operations in the Potomac.--destruction of Confederate batteries.--losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc. (search)
e Potomac flotilla. naval operations in the Potomac. destruction of Confederate batteries. Confederate rams. condition of the Navy, and list of vessels in December, 1862. losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc., etc. On the Potomac, the flotilla seems to have been actively employed from December, 1861, to May 2d, 1862. Altd neither zeal nor intelligence in dealing with this important problem. The following is a list of vessels of our Navy, published by the Navy Department in December, 1862; an enumeration which is calculated to mislead, for if any one supposes that the vessels therein described as iron-clads bore any comparison to those built byn musket balls, but easily penetrated by a twelve pound shot or shell. The list may be interesting as showing the historical account of our naval forces in December, 1862, but it conveys no idea of the frail barks in which the officers and men of the Navy had to fight the heaviest kind of earthworks, often perched at a great he
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 24: Second attack on Vicksburg, etc. (search)
board the transports as soon as the gun-boats arrived in Memphis, returned immediately to Holly Springs to carry out his part of the programme. This interview between Grant and Porter lasted just half an hour, and thus was started the expedition against Vicksburg, which, after a long and arduous siege and a great expenditure of men and money, resulted in the capture of the strongest point of defence occupied by the enemy during the war. The expedition from Memphis got away early in December, 1862, Commander Walke, in the Carondelet, being sent ahead with the Cairo, Baron DeKalb, and Pittsburg. (iron-clads,) and the Signal and Marmora ( tin-clads ) to clear the Yazoo River of torpedoes and cover the landing of Sherman's Army when it should arrive. This arduous and perilous service was well performed. On the 11th of December, Commander Walke dispatched the two tin-clads on a reconnoisance up the Yazoo. They ascended some twenty miles, when they were apprized of the presence of
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
these small bands, if they could have united they would have driven the Federal troops out of the country. The difficulty of the Confederates was that the naval vessels were always at hand, and they had received so many proofs of the effectiveness of their batteries that they seldom attacked the military posts except in the absence of the gun-boats. General Foster was fully alive to the value of the naval branch of the forces, and availed himself on all occasions of its services. In December, 1862, he planned an attack upon tie Confederate fortifications of Kinston and the railroad at or near Goldsborough, and asked the co-operation of the naval flotilla, at that time commanded by Commander A. Murray. The following gun-boats were assigned to this expedition: Delaware, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant A. P. Foster; Shawsheen, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant T. C. Woodward; Lockwood, Acting-Master G. W. Graves; Seymour, Acting-Master F. S. Wells, and the Army transports, Ocean Wave, Major
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
ritime power. The following table exhibits the progress made in increasing the Navy since December, 1862, and shows what the country was capable of achieving under a pressure that would have almost crushed any other nation: Comparative exhibit of the Navy, Dec., 1862, and 1863.   No. of Vessels. No. of Guns. Tons. Navy at date of present Report--Dec., 1863. 588 4,443 467,967 Navy at date of last Report--Dec., 1862. 427 3,268 340,036 Total increase 161 1,175 127,931 Vessels of the Navy lost since Dec., 1862. In What Manner Lost. No. of Vessels. No. of Guns. Tons. Dec., 1862. In What Manner Lost. No. of Vessels. No. of Guns. Tons. Captured 12 48 5,947 Destroyed to prevent falling into hands of Confederates 3 29 2,983 Sunk in battle or by torpedoes 4 28 2,201 Shipwreck, fire and collision 13 61 4,854 Total 32 166 15,985 Vessels placed under construction since Dec., 1862. Description. No. of Vessels. No. of Guns. Tons. Double-end iron steamers, 1,030 tons each 7 84 7,210 Single turret iron-clads, 61