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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,217 1,217 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 440 440 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 294 294 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 133 133 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 109 109 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 108 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 83 83 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 67 67 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 63 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1863 AD or search for 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. [The following reports were published in 1863, but are so rare as to be accessible to but few. We are confident, therefore, that many of our readers will be glad to have us print them from the original Mss. in our possession.] Headquarters cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, March 25, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. G.: General: I have the honor to enclose herewith the very graphic report of Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee of the battle of Kelleysville, (March 17th), between his brigade and a division of the enemy's cavalry. There is little to be said in addition. The dispositions made for meeting this anticipated raid were sufficient to have prevented or very much retarded the crossing of the Rappahannock at Kelleysville. The report shows wherein these dispositions failed of their object. The brigade, however, under its noble chief, so redeemed the day by an exhibition
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
rom Capt. Frank Potts, Petersburg, Va.-Ten numbers of The record of news, history and Literature, published at Richmond in 1863. From Major R. F. Walker, Superintendent of Public Printing, Richmond- Bound volume Senate Journal and documents, 1876irections for Proceedings. in the Confederate States Patent Office. Jomini's Practice of War. Richmond: West & Johnston, 1863. Proceedings of the Confederate States Congress on the announcement of the death of Col. Francis S. Bartow, of the Army orate States. The American Union, its Effect on National Character and Policy, by James Spence. Richmond: West & Johnston, 1863. Reply of S. Teackle Wallis, Esq., to the Letter of Hon. John Sherman, published by the Officers of the First Maryland Infantry, 1863. Address on the Constitution and Laws of the Confederate States of America, by Hon. Robt. H. Smith. Confederate States' Almanac of 1862. Senator Hammond and the Tribune, by, Troup. Rev. J. H. Thornwell, D. D., of Columbia, S. C., on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
Va., March 12th, 1877. A copy of your letter to Mr. Jones, the Secretary of the Southern Historical Society, in which you express a desire to have my opinion upon certain propositions suggested by you in regard to the Pennsylvania campaign of 1863, and the battle of Gettysburg, has been forwarded to me, and I take pleasure in giving my views on the several mooted questions. In the first place, I must say that you are mistaken in assuming that the Army of Northern Virginia was more powerhave procured a copy of the Review, corrected the errors and missprints, and sent it to---, through the address in Philadelphia you gave me. I will add a few notes here: 1st. ---- thinks it was a mistake to invade the Northern States at all in 1863. There were undoubted evils in such a course as --- clearly states, but he leaves out of view the fact that only a choice of evils existed for an army greatly inferior in numbers and resources in the presence of a powerful adversary — an adversar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Major Scheibert's book. (search)
ous day had ridden with Jackson in his last great flank attack. Major Scheibert remained six months in the Confederacy, gathering information by observation and otherwise of the operations of all the arms of our service. On his return home in 1863, we have heard that he delivered a lecture on the military operations of the Confederate army with especial reference to the Army of Northern Virginia, before 800 Prussian officers-among them the Prince of Prussia and other generals of high rank-at sought accuracy with that devotion to truth with which the true soldier-author should be inspired in the presence of great events. It will give pleasure to those who remember Major Scheibert so pleasantly in the Army of Northern Virginia in 1863, to know that he is alive and well, having served unharmed in the campaign against Austria, which ended in the battle of Sadowa. He was badly wounded in the late war against France in the battle of Worth. He remembers warmly his comrades of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notice. (search)
, Army Missionaries, Colporteurs and others, and by most touching examples of the power of faith in Christ to fit men for the camp, the march, the battle-field, the hospital, or the last struggle with the grim monster-Death. The book is gotten up in the admirable style which we always expect from these well known publishers. It is sold at the low price of $1.50, and we predict for it an extensive sale and wide usefulness. We notice an inaccuracy in the statement that the Chaplains met in Petersburg in the winter of 1864-5 to form a Chaplains' Association. This organization was perfected at Old Round Oak Church, in Caroline county, in the spring of 1863, and the meeting in Petersburg was only a regular meeting of the Association, which had been in active existence ever since. We may add that the subject, though well treated, is by no means exhausted, and there is still room for a book on Jesus in the Camp, or Religion in Lee's Army, which a friend of ours has been preparing.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg. (search)
intelligent or conscientious historians. To begin, you err in stating that the Army of Northern Virginia in its invasion of Pennsylvania was more powerful than it had ever been before. In numbers it was at its maximum in 1862, when contending with the Army of the Potomac, then commanded by your old chief and my friend, General McClellan, having at that time between 80,000 and 90,000 of all arms, while at Gettysburg it did not exceed 60,000. I may add that our invasion of the North in 1863 could scarcely be characterized as disastrous. It certainly was unfortunate in that we did not remain longer on Northern soil and detain the Army of the Potomac there, thus relieving Virginia of a great and too grievous burden. It was a question of the commissariat, to a very great extent, that carried the Army of Northern Virginia across the Potomac. This was so palpably the case that many believe it to have been the main or sole object of the expedition. There was no loss of morale on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ical Society: My dear Sir:---- , referring to the invasion of Pennsylvania in 1863, says: The Army of Northern Virginia, when it invaded the Northern States, was mral Lee to the drummer boy, who did not believe, when we invaded Pennsylvania in 1863, that it was able to drive the Federal army into the Atlantic Ocean. Not that ndpoint, and especially looking at the sequel of the invasion of Pennsylvania in 1863, he is correct, and I have no doubt that by far the greater number of historians the great cause which brought about the failure of the Pennsylvania campaign of 1863. The failure to crush the Federal army in Pennsylvania in 1863, in the opini1863, in the opinion of almost all the officers of the Army of Northern Virginia, can be expressed in five words — the absence of our cavalry. Train a giant for an encounter and hefter the fight, as he remarked to me, at Orange Courthouse, during the winter of 1863-64, when, animadverting upon the criticisms made upon the Gettysburg fight, espe