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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,217 1,217 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 440 440 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 294 294 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 133 133 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 109 109 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 108 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 83 83 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 67 67 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 63 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1863 AD or search for 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 12 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
Line, then, was established at Hanover Junction during the winter of 1863-64, charged with the duty of watching Lee's flanks, and particularlyyfellow with the prisoners when permitted to stalk among them. In 1863—my memoranda are lost—I was sent for to visit a prisoner in solitaryfficers appointed were sent to other duties, for during the whole of 1863 the majority of the battalions had but one field-officer, which was ance Rifles, of which about forty were captured during the year. In 1863 several improvements were attempted in the method of attaching the c extremely effective at short ranges. On several occasions during 1863 and 1864 where mortar-fire was desirable in the field, the twelve anr General Shoup. Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. by Colonel Charles H. Olmstead. [The following paper was read byy, feel his heart throb with pride in saying, I was at Charleston in 1863. Savannah, March, 1879. note.—Referring to the action of Colon<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line in the Confederate Army. (search)
been ordered. I was assigned to command the Second brigade of Jackson's division. On November 1, 1863, General Lee directed me to collect the Maryland troops and proceed to Hanover Junction, and ordered to report to me at once the Second Maryland Infantry, the First Maryland Cavalry, and the Baltimore Light Artillery. I was to have the other troops as soon as the exigencies of the service would permit. The Maryland Line, then, was established at Hanover Junction during the winter of 1863-64, charged with the duty of watching Lee's flanks, and particularly of protecting the bridges over the South Anna, which preserved his communication with Richmond. During the winter the Chesapeake Artillery, Captain W. Scott Chene, and the First Maryland Artillery, Captain W. F. Dement, reported to me and became part of the Maryland Line. The batteries were designated: First Maryland Artillery, formerly Maryland Light; Second Maryland Artillery, formerly Baltimore Light; Third Maryland A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
absolutely nothing formidable about the dog but his size, which was immense. He was one of the best-natured hounds whose head I ever patted, and one of the most cowardly. If a fise or a black-and-tan terrier barked at him as he stood majestic in the office-door, he would tuck his tail between his legs and skulk for a safer place. I never heard that he bit anything but the bones that were thrown him, and he was quite a playfellow with the prisoners when permitted to stalk among them. In 1863—my memoranda are lost—I was sent for to visit a prisoner in solitary confinement named Webster, who was about to be tried by court-martial as a spy. He was quite reticent as to his antecedents until after the trial, which resulted in a death sentence. Then he talked with me quite freely about his career. He had been recognized by some of the guards as having been an enlisted Confederate soldier at Island No.10, on the Mississippi river, which had been captured in April, 1862. He acknowledg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
ficers of these grades. The promotions, however, were either never made in full, or else the officers appointed were sent to other duties, for during the whole of 1863 the majority of the battalions had but one field-officer, which was often insufficient. The staff-officers for the battalions, and for the Chiefs of Artillery, wele of 1862, and these projectiles were used also in the beautiful United States three-inch Ordnance Rifles, of which about forty were captured during the year. In 1863 several improvements were attempted in the method of attaching the copper to the shell, and the saucer-shaped sabot was finally exchanged for a band or ring of coprought iron balls with very high charges against the ironclads, which would doubtless have been extremely effective at short ranges. On several occasions during 1863 and 1864 where mortar-fire was desirable in the field, the twelve and twenty-four pounder howitzers were used for the purpose very successfully, by sinking the tra
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. (search)
Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. by Colonel Charles H. Olmstead. [The following paper was read by its gallant and accomplished author before the Georgia Historical Society, March 3d, 1879, and we are sure our readers will thank us for giving them an opportunity of enjoying its perusal. We only regret that the crowded condition of our pages compels us to divide it.] In preparing the following paper, it has been my desire only to record what its title suggests—personal reminiscences. Leaving to other and abler pens the task of writing an accurate history of the scenes and events to which reference is now about to be made, I shall confine myself simply to the task of setting down such things as came under my personal observation, or within the scope of my individual knowledge. I do this the more confidently, remembering the marked interest that invariably attaches to the testimony of an eye-witness, and also bearing in mind (for my own comfort) that th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
xhibition of scientific warfare. The wonderful developments of engineering skill, both in the attack and in the defence, will ever mark the siege as a most memorable one, while the share of success attained by each side robs the memory of the event of any sting of mortification for Federal and Confederate alike. Sure am I that every member of the First Georgia who participated in these stirring scenes will, to his latest day, feel his heart throb with pride in saying, I was at Charleston in 1863. Savannah, March, 1879. note.—Referring to the action of Colonel Anderson, related on page 163, it is proper to state that the steamer Alice was sent out from Charleston in conformity to an explicit arrangement that had been entered into by the Commanding Generals for an exchange of wounded on that day. She carried a hospital flag, as well as the ordinary flag of truce. Soon after the firing ceased, she was met by the Federal steamer Cosmopolitan, bearing the Confederate wounded, w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nathan Hale of ArkansasDavid O. Dodd. (search)
tion you distinctly expressed it as the desire of the Society, to receive contributions from any source, particularly from Confederate sources, giving information bearing either upon the general conduct of the War between the States, or even upon well authenticated incidents of a personal nature, in that great struggle. In reply to that request, publicly expressed, I propose to give you an account of a tragical incident which occurred in the Trans-Mississippi Department, during the winter of 1863-4. Some years ago, while I was lecturing on the Greek and Latin languages in St. John's College of this State, the editors of a monthly periodical, The St. John's College Record, published and edited by our students, requested me to write for their paper, a series of articles, giving a history of the college, and of some of its prominent alumni. In the course of these articles I gave a detailed account of the apprehension, conviction and execution, as a Confederate spy, of David O. Dodd,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Allan's history of the Valley campaign. (search)
many interesting details of his movements—the clearness with which the marches, manoeuvres and battles are described—the full survey of the whole military situation, and the vivid description of the state of political affairs in Washington and abroad—the settling of the numerical strength on both sides—and last, but never least, nay first for the foreign reader, the excellent maps of Major Jed. Hotchkiss (which, by the way, he showed me and I greatly admired during the Gettysburg campaign of 1863,)—all combine to make Colonel Allan's book a military classic. I had already translated into German Colonel Allan's address before the Army of Northern Virginia Association on this campaign, as it appeared in the Southern Historical Society Papers, and had made a lecture on the subject at Stuttgart, as this address gave me a clear idea of this most interesting campaign of Stonewall Jackson. But the book gives an even better picture of it and excites a wish to possess still more of this
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
ginia. The winter of 1862 comes, and Burnside, succeeding McClellan, assails Lee at Fredericksburg on December 13th, and is repulsed with terrible slaughter. 1863—Chancellorsville. With the dawn of spring in 1863, a replenished army with a fresh commander, Fighting Joe Hooker, renews the onset by way of Chancellorsville, 1863, a replenished army with a fresh commander, Fighting Joe Hooker, renews the onset by way of Chancellorsville, and finds Lee with two divisions of Longstreet's corps absent in Southeast Virginia. But slender as are his numbers, Lee is ever aggressive; and while Hooker with the finest army on the planet, as he styled it, is confronting Lee near Chancellorsville, and Early is holding Sedgwick at bay at Fredericksburg, Jackson, who, under Leeet, and ere Meade is aware of this weakening of his opponent's forces, Longstreet is nine hundred miles away, striking a terrible blow at Chickamauga. The year 1863 passes by without other significant event in the story of the Army of Northern Virginia. Meade indeed, once in November, deployed his lines along Mine Run in seem
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
few and far between. Lieutenant Doncaster's adventure. After the surrender of Vicksburg, Miss., Pemberton's army was paroled, and at Enterprise, Miss., the troops were furnished a thirty days furlough and instructed to report at the end of that time at such places as the commanding General had designated. About twenty-five members of the Third Maryland Artillery were from East Tennessee, and at the expiration of the thirty days a number of them failed to return. During the summer of 1863 the Federals occupied a portion of East Tennessee and there was no communication by railroad between Dalton, Ga., and Bristol, Tennessee, therefore the only route left open for these men to return to their command was by the way of North Carolina. Captain Rowan learned that they, rather than return by that long circuitous route, had joined a cavalry company that was then operating in the neighborhood of Jonesboro, Tennessee. It will be remembered by all who served in East Tennessee during
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