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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,217 1,217 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 440 440 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 294 294 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 133 133 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 109 109 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 108 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 83 83 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 67 67 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 63 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1863 AD or search for 1863 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
last at Malvern Hill was fought, when, without orders, they reinforced the fagged forces of General T. H. Holmes, on Lee's extreme right, and where they stood unbroken for two days under the Paixhans and bombs of the enemy's batteries and ironclads, though regiments of infantry and batteries of artillery of General Junius Daniel's command stampeded through their ranks. After that, Colonel A. W. Starke riddled one of the enemy's side-wheel steamers from the heights of Deep Bottom. Again, in 1863, they were given the most difficult order to be executed which can be issued from headquarters. To make a divertisement in favor of Longstreet in his operations around Suffolk, in Nansemond, and to prevent the enemy from sending reinforcements from Yorktown against him, orders were issued to me from Richmond to move with all my available force as low down the peninsula as possible, and to do all the damage possible to the enemy and threaten him as closely as was in my power, without hazardin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
y either of us. After we reached the camp, occurred the brief conversation I have quoted, as to the horrors of war. His religious liberality. A very remarkable illustration of Jackson's religious liberality was shown just before the battle of Chancellorsville. We had been ordered to send to the rear all surplus baggage, and to illustrate how rigidly this was done—only one tent, and that a small one, was allowed for the headquarters of the corps. It was intended to make the campaign of 1863 a very active one. We must make this campaign, said Jackson, an exceedingly active one. Only thus can a weaker country cope with a stronger. It must make up in activity what it lacks in strength, and a defensive campaign can only be made successful by taking the aggressive at the proper time. Don't wait for the adversary to become fully prepared, but strike him the first blow. When all the tents, among other surplus baggage, were taken away, a Roman Catholic priest of one of the Louisiana
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
p with her, much less in engaging her in combat. In the fall of 1865 her commander gained conclusive information that the war had gone against the South, and he leisurely and uninterruptedly made his way to England, where he gave himself and his ship into the hands of the British government. The Shenandoah was a full-rigged ship of 1,000 tons and 250 horse power, with a battery of four 8-inch guns—two 32-pounders and two 12-pounders. She was originally the British ship Sea King, built in 1863 for the East India trade. On her return to England from her first voyage she was purchased by Confederate agents in Europe and fitted out as a cruiser in the Confederate service, primarily to disperse and destroy the New England whaling fleet in the northern seas. She had been designed as a transport for troops, had spacious decks and large air ports, and was well suited for conversion into a cruiser. A fast sailer under canvas, her steam power was more than auxiliary, as she could exceed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
iation, as it is the historian's duty to keep up your records. Comrades of the Cobb Legion, Georgia Cavalry, little did we think as we marched the streets of Richmond, Va., at our late reunion, to the soul-stirring, familiar airs of our old war songs, that he who had so often ridden at the head of your squadron, whose sabre had so often flashed in your front, the true hero of The Cobb Legion, Georgia Cavalry, your Adjutant in 1861, your Major and Lieutenant-Colonel in 1862, your Colonel in 1863, your Brigadier-General in 1864 and 1865, P. M. B. Young, was then lying at the point of death, in the Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, far, far away from home, kith and kindred. True to his knightly instincts, when satisfied that he had a mortal hurt, unwilling to be a charge to his numerous friends or for them to witness his agony, he went to die alone! True to his proud spirit, he had wrested for a long time with the dread disease, while his intimates, looking only at that grand p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
the division being commanded by Rodes. Gettysburg had proved to be the lion in the path of General Lee's march into the enemy's country, and he soon fell back into Virginia. In operations at Vidiersville, and near Brandy Station in the fall of 1863, the regiment sustained loss, but not heavy. In barracks, at Hanover, during the winter of 1863 and 1864, the regiment may be said to have had a really good time, as did the entire brigade. So at the opening of the campaign in 1864, the regiment1863 and 1864, the regiment may be said to have had a really good time, as did the entire brigade. So at the opening of the campaign in 1864, the regiment and entire brigade appeared well recruited for duty, well equipped and in good fighting trim generally. Governor Vance, in a speech to the army, said the boys looked like they had corn to sell. This remark of Governor Vance's suggested most strikingly the contrast as between the appearance of the troops then and their woebegone plight on the return from the fatal field of Gettysburg. It was somewhat now like it was when the fight first opened at Chancellorsville, barring the fact that the re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
, James H. Wilson, Howard Wilson, Samuel B. Walker. Killed—A. A. Moore; Robert McChesney, bushwhacked near St. George, Tucker county, in 1861; Andrew Ervin, killed at Bratton's farm; Howard Houston, in battle, 1864; James Lockridge in battle in 1863; A. B. Mackey, at Moorefield, W. Va., in 1864; H. Rudd Morrison, in 1862; John F. Tribbett, at Monocacy in 1864; Samuel B. Walker and James H. Wilson, April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Courthouse; M. X. White, shot by Hunter's command near Lexington, wte Sulphur Springs, Major, and Edward S. Roe, of Orange Courthouse, Surgeon. It was one of the regiments out of four that raided Pennsylvania to enforce the order of levying a tax of several hundred thousand dollars on the cities and towns of that State, as compensation for the burning of the mills and barns in the Shenandoah Valley by Sheridan in 1863. They burned Chambersburg because the Council of that city refused to pay the levy of $150,000. The regiment surrendered at Appomattox in 186
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
The Slaughter at Petersburg, June 18, 1864. [from the Sunday news, Charleston, S. C., July 25, 1897.] There was no fighting around Petersburg in 1863. Some interesting personal reminiscences of the fatal day, and those which immediately preceded and succeeded it, by Judge Wm. M. Thomas, then an officer of Rion's Battalf the Maine Artillery during the late war between the States, gives a history of the Federal attack upon the lines at Petersburg on June 18, 1864. He writes it as 1863, but that was a mistake. There was no fighting around Petersburg in 1863, and all with whom I have conversed agree that 1864 is correct. Otherwise his descriptio1863, and all with whom I have conversed agree that 1864 is correct. Otherwise his description from the Federal standpoint is in accord with my recollection. As this was a bloody and remarkable battle, and no account of it has been written for several years, you will, I hope, allow me to give the Confederate version of the battle. Even the Federal official reports have been strangely reticent concering the operations
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
t glory claim the hero's name, And tell the world his worth. The bronze head of Sam Davis was one of the most admired works of art in the Parthenon of the Tennessee Centennial. This bust, executed by Julian Zolling, represents a nobly formed head; the boyish face conveys an impression of courage, strength and sweetness. Many visitors were attracted to this bit of bronze; singularly enough, many of them had never before heard of Sam Davis and his tragic death. Here is the story: In 1863 General Bragg sent a number of picked men, as scouts, among them Sam Davis, into Middle Tennessee in order to gain information concerning the Federal army; he wished to know if the Union army was re-enforcing Chattanooga. The men were to go South and send their reports by courier line to General Bragg at Missionary Ridge. The expedition was attended with much danger. The scouts had seen the 16th Army Corps, commanded by General Dodge, move from Corinth to Pulaski, and on Friday, Novembe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
of the company is outlined. The names of 178 men appear on the roll. Fifty-one were killed and wounded. Of these, twenty-one were killed on the battle-field, or died in hospital; sixteen were discharged, being disabled by wounds, and fourteen returned to duty. Thirteen men were captured and released from prison at the surrender; twenty-one were discharged, or did not re-enlist at the reorganization of the company; nine were transferred to Company K, of the Thirteenth, at the reorganization of the regiment; twelve men were promoted and commissioned in the regiment and other branches of the service; twelve others had permanent details. Fifty-seven men laid down their arms at Appomattox Courthouse. The company always having more than the legal number on its roll, could only enlist non-conscripts—viz: boys under 18 years of age; hence the average age was under twenty years in 1863-‘64. No substitutes were accepted. William N. Blow, Captain Company H, Thirteenth Virginia Caval
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
nd A. J. Hayslett lieutenants in order named. Captain Lusk resigned June, 1863, on account of ill health. W. K. Donald was made captain, and served as such until the end. A. J. Hayslett, previous to May 1, 1862, served as company surgeon, and in 1863 was made surgeon of the battalion, and William T. Wilson, then a member of the Danville Blues, of Eighteenth Virginia Regiment, was elected lieutenant, and served as such until the close. After the promotions in consequence of Captain Lusk's resi 1864; Ed. N. Heizer, at Charlottesville, June 1865; Samuel Hite and W. N. Hite, at Staunton, 1861; William Lawhorn, at Staunton, 1862; S. S. Miller and Thomas P. McDowell, at Gordonsville, 1862; William Orenbaun, 1861; James P. Paxton, in prison, 1863; John Paxton, at Richmond, 1862; Cooke Sloan, at Staunton, 1861; James Steele, at Point Lookout, April, 1865; Benjamin Templeton, at Staunton, 1861; John White and Cyrus Withers, at Richmond, 1862; J. Womeldorf, 1861. Wounded and Recovered—Hugh
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