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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,217 1,217 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 440 440 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 294 294 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 133 133 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 109 109 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 108 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 83 83 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 67 67 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 63 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1863 AD or search for 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 11 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lane's Corps of sharpshooters. (search)
Lane's Corps of sharpshooters. The career of this famous body, with a roster of its officers. The corps of sharpshooters of Lane's brigade was organized after the brigade went into winter quarters at Liberty Mills, Orange county, Va., in 1863. Picked officers and men were detailed from the regiments in proportion to their respective strength, and put in charge of Captain John G. Knox, of the 7th, who was a cool, brave and popular officer, and a splendid tactician. They were excused from all camp and picket duties, and thoroughly drilled in their special duties. When the following campaign opened, this corps was as fine a body of soldiers as the world ever saw. In the Wilderness, on the 5th of May, 1864, the brigade was assigned a position on the left of the road near the home of a Mr. Turning, and the corps was pushed far to the front. Soon afterwards, the brigade was ordered to form at right angles to its original position for the purpose of sweeping the woods in fron
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
h myself first, and Captain James A. Wilson, of the Churchville cavalry, second in command. In 1863 the 14th, with several other regiments, 16th and 17th cavalry, with V. A. Witcher's battalion of ut under General A. G. Jenkins. Jenkins's Brigade was in advance of General R. E. Lee's army in 1863, when it invaded Pennsylvania. Our brigade was in the battle of Martinsburg, Va., where we captuwounded. The hard service the company saw with Lee's army after its return from Pennsylvania, in 1863, until I recovered from the effects of my wound, I have no personal knowledge of. It participated, in the battle of Droop Mountain, not far from Lewisburg, West Virginia, and spent the winter of 1863-‘64 in Monroe county, West Virginia. In the spring of 1864, General Jenkins having been killed Flournoy, Nicholas E. Ford, Luther R., Corporal. Ford, Abner S., wounded at Lynchburg in 1863. Ford, John R. Ford, J. B. Fossett, Peter. Flournoy, Dr. David, Captain from November
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Glowing tribute to General R. E. Lee. (search)
uly, 1863, at Gettysburg, nor can I dwell on that view of him further than to speak of carrying dispatches from General Stuart there. At Hagerstown I carried messages to General Lee and found him flying at his headquarters for the first time The Milk White Banner of the Confederacy, with the battle-flag at its union, which formed the next to the last national flag of our country. The greatest of men. With occasional glimpses of him on the march as we entered upon the fall campaign of 1863, I was learning to look upon him as no longer a curiosity. I knew nothing of him personally up to that time. But in the winter of 1864 I was sent to him frequently and as the aid-de-camp of General Stuart was admitted on occasion to the commanding general's tent. He would speak to me briefly, but with a cordial and gentle deep tone, and would ask after Stuart with good will and kindly interest. I can recall the deep impression these interviews made upon me. No emperor on his throne, n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Very complete roll [from the Richmond, A., Dispatch, September 16th, 1900.] (search)
, Va. Blair, James—Dismissed from service and died. Bauserman, John H.—Wounded at Mechanics' Gap, near Romney, June 20, 1861; permanently disabled, and discharged at Fairfax, 1861. Bushong, Calvin P.—Transferred to 12th Virginia Cavalry, 1863. Died in Clarke county, Va., after the war. Burke, Robert W.—Detailed for other service. Resides at Edinburg, Va. Bowman, John W.—Resides at Owen's Mills, Md. Bargelt, William H.—Transferred to Rosser's Cavalry, 1862. Died since the wanfantry, 1862. Resides in Clarke county, Va. Fadeley, Michael M.—Transferred from 33d Virginia Infantry or 12th Cavalry. Surrendered at Spotsylvania, May 12, 1864, and died at Richmond, 1865. Fravel, Henry C.—Transferred to Chew's Battery, 1863. Died at Luray, Va., November 28, 1894. Fravel, John W.—Wounded at Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863; right leg amputated below the knee. Died at Woodstock in 1900. Ferrell, Oliver P.—Transferred to 7th Virginia Cavalry Band. Su
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate States Navy and a brief history of what became of it. [from the Richmond, Va. Times December 30, 1900.] (search)
1865. Charleston—Iron-clad, six guns. Built in 1863 at Charleston and destroyed by the Confederates at tericksburg—Iron-clad, four guns. Built at Richmond, 1863, and burned by the Confederates at the evacuation ofShe was burned by the Confederates in Yazoo river in 1863 to prevent capture. Isendiga-Wooden gun-boat, thr six guns. Burned by Confederates in Yazoo river in 1863. Louisiana—Iron-clad, built at New Orleans, 1862,na—Iron-clad, four guns; built at Wilmington, N. C., 1863; sprung aleak and sunk in Cape Fear river in Septembseven guns; burned by Confederates in Yazoo river in 1863, to avoid capture. PHOeNIX—Iron-clad floating batamer, mounted seven guns. Burned by Confederates in 1863 on the Arkansas river. Queen of the West—Iron-proe British gun-boat Victoria. Purchased at London in 1863 and taken to Calais, but on account of complicationse-wheel, two guns. Accidentally sunk at Savannah in 1863. Teaser—Wooden tug, two guns, bought at R
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The correspondence of Gen. Robt. E. Lee. (search)
ompt assembling of the main body of them * * together with as many as can be drawn from the army of General Beauregard at Culpeper C. H., under the command of that officer. It should never be forgotten that our concentration at any point, compels that of the enemy, and his numbers being limited, tends to relieve all other threatened localities. Page 946.Abstract from the Department of North Carolina, Major General D. H. Hill Commanding, Headquarters near Richmond, Virginia, June 30th, 1863. Permanent force: Clingman's Brigade, Cook's Brigade,Officers, 1,308. Martin's Brigade, Colquitt's Brigade,Aggregate present, 22,822. Jenkins' Brigade. Ransom's Brigade, Unattached Infantry,Pieces of Field artillery, 104. Artillery, Cavalry. Major-General Elsey's command. Wise's Brigade. Corse's Brigade, of Pickett's Division.Numbers not given. Local troops. Mr. Davis' letter to General Lee, June 28, 1863. Giving reasons why he could not send General Beaureg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
he fight on that day, and he took them into the fight the third day. On that day Tom Cozart, of Company F, carried the flag. Cozart fell (killed) with the colors just before reaching the stone fence. The others were killed or wounded, and that he, Hudspeth, was knocked down by the bursting of a shell. The following are the names of the killed, mortally wounded and wounded in Company F, 26th Regiment, North Carolina Troops, Pettigrew's Brigade, at the battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July I-3, 1863, as reported to the Richmond, Va., Enquirer or Examiner, soon after the battle, by the Captain R. M. Tuttle, as he lay wounded in the hospital in Richmond: We went into the battle July 1, 1863, with eighty-eight rank and file and three commissioned officers—the captain and two lieutenants —ninety-one in all. Every man was either killed or wounded, viz: Killed on the field. Lieutenant John B. Holloway. Pivates. Robert M. Braswell. I. H. Coffey. T. J. Cozart. James Deal. Ja
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
that I have proceeded to appoint the officers therein provided to be appointed in and for said Territory. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States of America, at Richmond, this 14th day of February, A. D. 1862. By the President: (Seal.) Jefferson Davis. R. M. T. Hunter, Secretary of War. So much now for the facts of the Territory of Arizona, as to being created and organized by and under the government of the Confederate States of America. In the next year, 1863, on the 24th day of February, it appears that the Congress of the United States, in session in Washington city, followed the Congress of the Confederate States and passed an act to establish and organize the Territory of Arizona, formerly a part of the Territory of New Mexico. The name, as will be observed, is the same as that of the Confederate Territory. See the United States Statutes-at-Large, volume twelve, page 664, or Revised Statutes of the United States, edition of 1878, page 335. I
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate treaty. (search)
of Jefferson Davis, who succeeded in effecting the consummation of this unique treaty, was Lieutenant-Colonel C. H. Giddings, of the Confederate States of America, who was in command of the Confederate forces of Fort Duncan, Eagle Pass, Texas, in 1863 and 1864. Colonel Giddings is now in Washington, and his account of this transaction is both interesting and novel. In 1863 I was commissioned by Jefferson Davis as lieutenant-colonel in command of the Confederate forces at Fort Duncan, Eagle P1863 I was commissioned by Jefferson Davis as lieutenant-colonel in command of the Confederate forces at Fort Duncan, Eagle Pass, said Colonel Giddings to your correspondent. On assuming command of the fort, I was advised that an old Federal soldier, by the name of McManus, who had been paroled at the surrender of General Twiggs and broken his parole, and crossed the Rio Grande and opened a recruiting office for the Federals in Piedras Negras, Mexico, and, that it was the headquarters for the organization of bands of renegades and Mexican thieves, who were committing depredations upon the property of citizens of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard. (search)
rg. An address of Gen Johnson Hagood at the Beauregard Memorial meeting at Charleston, S. C., December 1, 1894. Following is the admirable address of General Johnson Hagood at the great Beauregard memorial meeting in Charleston, S. C., December I, 1894. It is a graphic story of three engagements, or rather series of engagements, in the defence of Richmond. South Carolinians had a leading place in the picture, as their brigade commander and General Beauregard attest: The winter of 1863-‘64, with its comparative quiet, had closed, and the Federals and Confederates were concentrating and marshalling their forces for a more vigorous and decisive campaign than had yet marked the history of the war. Virginia and Tennessee were respectively in the East and West, the theatres upon which the opposing banners were unfurled, and it was evident that around these two centres would be collected in hostile array all the strength that either party possessed. Gilmore, with the bulk of h
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