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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,217 1,217 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 440 440 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 294 294 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 133 133 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 109 109 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 108 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 83 83 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 67 67 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 63 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16.. You can also browse the collection for 1863 AD or search for 1863 AD in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16., Distinguished guests and residents of Medford. (search)
ods to the wrongs redressing A worthier paladin. Shall he not hear the blessing, Good and faithful, enter in. Phillips Brooks was frequently at the house (1861-1863) of Mrs. A. K. Hathaway, Ashland street, to see a friend who boarded there. Some of our citizens remember that George L. Brown, the well-known artist, made his home (1863) in the old Bishop house on Salem street opposite the burying ground, for a year or so. Mr. Brown had a married sister, Mrs. Myrick, who lived on South street court. This may account for the artist's presence among us. He had a daughter, Angelica, born in Rome, I believe, who attended the Everett School. In appearaas Richard M. Staigg, who had been a pupil of Washington Allston, and excelled in miniature painting, had pupils here to whom he gave instruction in drawing (about 1863). John G. Whittier was a guest in the home of his brother, Matthew Francis Whittier, who at that time (1865-8) owned the cottage house on Pleasant street (prese
of it was the old brick shop where the hammers of the gold beaters resounded as those of the ship-builders in the ship-yard had rung in other days, but in war time Mr. Lauriat lived at the lower end of Salem street. How innocent his market basket looked when he started for Boston, although all of us knew what precious freight he carried. Opposite, on the corner of River street, was the terminal of the Medford and Charlestown horse railroad. This form of rapid transit was in commission in 1863 I know, but for a time was not used; it revived and was discontinued again before street railway service came to stay. In one of these intervals the building was used by Frank Moran as a livery stable. Beyond Dead Man's Alley, as the irreverent called it, was God's Acre, where now, as in days of yore, the forefathers of the hamlet sleep. The Baptist Church came next, with its high flight of outside steps leading to the auditorium, and its basement entrance to the Sunday-school room. Its