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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 776 776 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 37 37 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 15 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 11 11 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for January, 1863 AD or search for January, 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
perior, and many officers consider the retreat from before the harbor a disgraceful affair. Had the gallant Renshaw lived, it would have been different. In January, 1863, another disaster befell Farragut's fleet. As soon as he heard of the capture of Galveston, he sent Captain Bell with the Brooklyn and six gun-boats to retaked men of the Hatteras were made to feel keenly the unkind criticisms of those who professed no unkind feeling towards the United States or its people. From January, 1863, Farragut was employed in conjunction with General Banks Commander William D. Porter, (afterwards Commodore U. S. Navy.) in forcing his way into the interiore mentioned, in the Teche, drove him from a strongly fortified position and blockaded the Confederate iron-clad above the obstructions near Pattersonville. In January, 1863, he was again on the Teche chasing the Confederate forces and was this time accompanied by a brigade of infantry and cavalry under General Weitzel. The enemy
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
other rivers was not great, it had powerful coadjutors in those little gun-boats which the enemy at first professed to despise, but which they were anxious to avoid when circumstances brought them near together. On many occasions a few gun-boats were of more advantage than a division of soldiers would have been. Mississippi Squadron. Vessels employed at Vicksburg during the siege, with list of officers. Names of vessels, officers, etc., are obtained from the Navy Register of January, 1863, unless some other date is appended thus (1864), (1865). Officers who received favorable notice in Admiral Porter's official report, dated July 13, 1863 (concerning the fall of Vicksburg and operations on the river), are marked thus*. Flag-ship Black Hawk (3d rate). *Lieutenant-Commander, K. R. Breese; Fleet-Surgeon, Ninian Pinkney; Assistant Surgeon, J. C. Bertolette; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. H. Sells; Ensigns, W. B. Bridgeman, Merrill Miller, S. H. Hunt and G. M. Brown; Act
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
case Dupont determined to attack the batteries, and with which he was expected to be victorious. For after the fight of the Monitor with the Merrimac, and her success, the turreted vessels had grown in favor with all classes of people, and many ran to the other extreme of supposing that the Monitors were invulnerable, that all they had to do was to haul up alongside the Confederate fortifications and drive the gunners away. Some of these vessels arrived at Charleston bar as early as January, 1863, and Dupont, who was a sagacious and prudent officer, considered it his duty, before commencing any important operations, to have them tested to see what their turrets and hull would bear, and to ascertain whether anything could be done to improve their defensive power. The turret principle had only been tried once in battle, and then only against guns the largest of which were the 7-inch rifles in the bow and stern of the Merrimac, neither of which, it is clear, ever struck the Monit
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
n. Secretary Welles' letter to Rear-Admiral Dupont on his giving up his command. list of officers who served under Admiral Dupont. Operations commenced in January, 1863, by some of the vessels of Rear-Admiral Dupont's squadron capturing a large blockade-running steamer, which proved to be one of the most valuable prizes of the by the Navy Department as a gun-boat. and performed good service, under Commander M. B. Woolsey, at the capture of the forts at Donaldsonville, La. During January, 1863, the harbor of Charleston was not occupied by the Federal squadron, but the vessels lay outside the bar, keeping a bright look-out. Towards the end of the monry respectfully, Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Rear-Admiral S. F. Dupont, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. South Atlantic Squadron, January, 1863. List of vessels and officers under Rear-Admiral Samuel F. Dupont. Captain C. R. P. Rodgers, Captain of the Fleet. Steam-frigate Wabash, Flag-ship.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
e naval officer, but he was a man who had no superior in the Navy in point of dash,energy and courage, and, if he had ever had the opportunity of commanding a fleet in action, he would have done it with the coolness and bravery of Nelson. No higher compliment could be paid him. List of vessels composing the East Gulf Blockading Squadron. Under Acting-Rear-Admiral Theodorus Bailey; Lieutenant-Commander William G. Temple, Fleet-Captain. As obtained from the navy register of January, 1863, with names of commanding and other officers. Frigate St. Lawrence--Flag-ship. Commander, James F. Schenck; Fleet Surgeon, G. R. B. Horner; Paymaster, Washington Irving; Assistant Surgeon, W. K. Van Reypen; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, A. B. Poor; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, A. Shirk; Acting-Masters, Wm. H. Smith, John Fuller, Chas. DeBevoise and George J. Murray; Acting-Master's Mates, E. Pavys, E. S. D. Howland, John Boyle, V. W. Jones and T. W. Jones; Marine Corps: Second-Lieutenan
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
ma and Shenandoah. criticisms, remarks, etc., etc. We have told the story of the Sumter and Alabama, and partly that of the Florida, which latter, after her escape from the Federal squadron off Pensacola, particularly the R. R. Cuyler, in January, 1863, commenced the business of destruction for which she was fitted out. In her first attempts at destruction the Florida was not particularly fortunate, for in the course of ten days Captain Maffitt only succeeded in destroying three small vewas sent to Boston and condemned by the Admiralty Court, her alleged owner never receiving a penny of the £ 15,000 he had paid into the Confederate treasury as the price of the vessel. The fate of the Nashville has already been mentioned. In January and February, 1863, several attempts were made to destroy her as she lay above Fort McAllister, on the Great Ogeechee River. On the 27th of February, 1863, she was set on fire and blown up by shells from the Monitor Montauk, Commander John L. W