Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for January 1st, 1863 AD or search for January 1st, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
laneous engagements of the gun-boats. death of Commander Buchanan. vessels and officers of the West Gulf Squadron, January 1, 1863. Up to the time of the escapade of the ram Arkansas, a general idea has been given of the performances of Farragueveral entrances of the arbor to prevent the exit or entrance of the enemy. We did not hold this place long. On January 1st, 1863, General Magruder attacked our vessels with three steamers, fitted with cotton-bale defences, and manned by sharpsh of the U. S. Steamer Harriet Lane by the Confederates, under General Magruder, in Galveston harbor on the night of January 1st, 1863. Union fleet, General Magruder filled the streets of Galveston with a superior force of troops, captured all ou conducted as combined military and naval operations, when they were generally successful. West Gulf Squadron, January 1st, 1863 Rear-Admiral David G. Farragut, Commander-in-chief. Steamer Hartford, Flag-ship. Captain, James S. Palmer,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
ry forces. His peculiarities unfitted him for such a command, and these peculiarities became so offensive to Generals Sherman and McPherson, and to Admiral Porter, that they urged General Grant to take command himself as the only chance for the success of the enterprise, and in consequence, the latter hastened to Milliken's Bend or Young's Point and assumed the command of all the forces, which he was entitled to do, being military commander of the department. Mississippi Squadron, January 1, 1863. (excepting some of the vessels engaged at Vicksburg.) Acting Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commander-in-Chief. Receiving-ship Clara Dolson. (Cairo.) Lieutenant-Commander, Thomas Pattison, Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Emile Gavarret; Paymaster, Edward May; Acting-Master, John C. Bunner; Acting-Ensigns, E. C. Van Pelt and D. W. Tainter; Acting-Master's Mates, H. G. Masters and John D. Holmes; Acting-Engineer, Geo. W. Fulton; Acting-Carpenter, G. W. Armstrong. Steamer Eastport.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
adding history to the Navy by successful captures of arms and munitions of war, and creating great astonishment abroad at the ability of the Federals to keep up such an effective blockade, contrary to the predictions of able statesmen and experienced admirals. This duty was relieved somewhat of its monotony, as it paid well in prize-money, which amply compensated officers and sailors for any hardships they had to undergo in winter storms or summer heats. North Atlantic Squadron, January 1, 1863. Acting-Rear-Admiral Samuel P. Lee. Commander Pierce Crosby, Fleet Captain, July, 1863.--Lieutenant R. H. Lamson, Flag Lieutenant, April, 1863. Steam-Frigate Minnesota--Flag-Ship. Commander, N. B. Harrison; Lieutenant-Commander, E. C. Grafton; Lieutenant, Adolphus Dexter; Fleet Surgeon, W. Maxwell Wood; Surgeon, John S. Kitchen; Assistant Surgeons, S. J. Jones and E. R. Dodge; Paymaster, C. C. Upham; Chaplain, T. G. Salter; Marines: Captain, W. L. Shuttle-worth, Second-Lieu