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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 34 34 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 2 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for January 8th, 1863 AD or search for January 8th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Lincoln's Usurpations.speech of Mr. Saulsbury,of Delaware, in the United States Senate, Jan. 8th, 1863. [From the New York Caucasian.] Mr. Saulsbury.--Mr. President, when the injustice and intolerance of the British ministry were forcing an issue between the parent country and the colonies in reference to the power of Parliament to impose taxes upon the latter without their consent, the remonstrances of the ablest English statesmen were treated by the advocates of power as the utterances of sedition. It was then that the noble Chatham thus spoke: "Sorry I am to hear the liberty of speech in this House imputed as a crime. But the imputation shall not discourage me. It in a liberty I mean to exercise. No gentleman ought to be afraid to exercise it. It is a liberty by which the gentleman who calumniates it might have profited." It has been frequently said upon this floor since the commencement of this unnatural war, that we are making history. Sir, we are but repeatin