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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 4 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 3 3 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for January 31st, 1863 AD or search for January 31st, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
keep their mills going and prevent a revolt of the factory operatives. The English Government did nothing to prevent blockade-running, and doubtless considered it a fair business enterprise. If a vessel got safely in past the blockaders, her cargo sold at a large profit, and she loaded with cotton, worth three times as much as the ingoing cargo. There was great excitement as well Surrender of the U. S. Steamer Mercedita to the Confederate ram, Palmetto State, off Charleston harbor, Jan. 31, 1863. as profit to the hardy Britons who engaged in this trade. In some respects the Confederates had advantages superior to our own. The markets of Europe were glutted with rifled guns and engines, and almost all the blockade-runners carried rifled field-guns for the Confederates, while the conservative Army and Navy Departments of the North felt it due to the people that all the implements of war should e made at home. The result was that the Confederates at an early stage of the war ha
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
er John and Nathaniel Taylor 1,700 00 294 85 1,405 15 New York   Commodore Perry, Underwriter, Whitehead. Schooner J. W. Wilder 24,618 44 3,431 26 21,187 18 do Dec. 1, 1863 R. R. Cuyler. Schooner Joana Ward 7,503 00 1,995 14 5,507 86 do Jan. 31, 1863 Harriet Lane. Schooner J. G. McNeil 6,536 90 1,306 92 5,229 98 do Oct. 20, 1863 Arthur. Schooner James Norcom Waiting for prize list of Shawsheen. 2,200 00 319 85 1,880 15 do   Shawsheen. Schooner Julia Worden 3,090 34 986 54 2,10880 15 do   General Putnam. Schooner Louisa Agnes 1,105 00 1,401 00 No proceeds do   General Putnam. Schooner Lizzie Weston 76,286 67 8,738 92 67,457 75 do Feb. 17, 1863 Itasca. Schooner Lucy C. Holmes 29,745 62 3,952 10 25,793 52 do Jan. 31, 1863 Santiago de Cuba. Schooner Louise 45,053 49 1 970 51 43,082 98 Boston Jan. 23, 1863 Albatross. Steamer Lizzie 12,244 73 1,836 04 10,408 69 Philadelphia Jan. 11, 1864 Santiago de Cuba. Schooner Louisa 1,977 27 1,078 62 898 65 do Feb.