Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for March 3rd, 1863 AD or search for March 3rd, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 45: an antislavery policy.—the Trent case.—Theories of reconstruction.—confiscation.—the session of 1861-1862. (search)
ment to inform the secretary of the vote. Seward leaped from his lounge, where he had been sleeping, and exclaimed: Good God! the Democrats have disappeared! This is the greatest act of the Administration. Lord Lyons came in the evening to Sumner's lodgings overflowing with gratitude and joy. The Duchess of Argyll by letter, May 18. congratulated Sumner on the result Later in the session Sumner secured legislation giving effect to the treaty. At the next session he introduced, March 3, 1863, a joint resolution further to give effect to the treaty, which was carried. He recurred briefly to the treaty in debate, March 9, 1868. The honest co-operation of the two great nations sealed the fate of the slave-trade. A few years later the mixed courts, instituted for its suppression, being without business, were discontinued. On the day the treaty was ratified, He wrote to Dr. Lieber: Rarely has the Senate done so much in a single day. Sumner carried in the Senate (after a pre
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. The third session of the Thirty-seventh Congress began Dec. 1, 1862, and ended March 3, 1863. Early in the session there was a movement for the displacement of Mr. Seward as Secretary of State. It came from a wide-spread feeling in the country, as well as in Congress, that he was wanting in earnest convictions as to the character ocorrespondence by American citizens resident abroad with the Confederate government or its agents, Jan. 7 and Feb. 13, 1863 (Globe, pp. 214, 925); carrying into effect the convention with Peru for the settlement of claims, Feb. 24 and 26, and March 3, 1863 (Globe, pp. 1235, 1301, 1489, 1512); derangement of mails between New York and Washington, Jan. 7, 1863 (Globe, p. 215); indemnity to the owners of a French brig for injury in a collision with a United States war vessel, Dec. 10, 1862 (Glo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 49: letters to Europe.—test oath in the senate.—final repeal of the fugitive-slave act.—abolition of the coastwise slave-trade.—Freedmen's Bureau.—equal rights of the colored people as witnesses and passengers.—equal pay of colored troops.—first struggle for suffrage of the colored people.—thirteenth amendment of the constitution.— French spoliation claims.—taxation of national banks.— differences with Fessenden.—Civil service Reform.—Lincoln's re-election.—parting with friends.—1863-1864. (search)
to an exclusion under distressing circumstances which had recently occurred–he procured an amendment to a charter for a street railway between Washington and Alexandria, forbidding discrimination on account of color in the carriage of passengers. The amendment passed by only one majority, several of the Republican senators—Anthony, Howe, and Lane among them—voting against it. Feb. 27, 1863. Congressional Globe, p. 1328. It was concurred in by the House, and became part of the Act of March 3, 1863. At the session now under review, he carried the same amendment to two charters, succeeding after spirited contests by a small majority in each case,—defeated at one stage and prevailing at a later one. Feb. 10, 25, March 16, 17, June 21, 1864; Works, vol. VIII. pp. 103-117. The amendment was rejected, June 21, by fourteen to sixteen,—Foster, Grimes, Sherman, and Trumbull voting nay; but moved again by Sumner on the same day, it passed by a vote of seventeen to sixteen. The oppo