hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 22 22 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 81 results in 57 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The March of Lew Wallace's division to Shiloh. (search)
rigade,says in his report that three of the four regiments received orders to march with their trains about 2 P. M., and to advance toward Pittsburg Landing in advance of the trains at 4 P. M. This they did (General Wallace informs us) by the route shown on the map. The fourth regiment went to Crump's to guard the public property. The Official Records (Vol. X., p. 177) also tain a rough sketch map, submitted by General con-Wallace to General Halleck, accompanying a memorandum dated March 14th, 1863. That map is manifestly imperfect in representing but one bridge between A and the right of the army, the junction of Owl and Snake creeks being placed above the upper Snake creek bridge, instead of below it. General Wallace himself has informed the editors that that map is incorrect, and that its inaccuracy arose from a prevalent confusion of the names of Snake and Owl creeks. That map, however, faithfully represents General Wallace's claim that the head of his column advanced to wit
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 18: Fredericksburg. (search)
limits, was despatched, it was his favorite occupation to have singing; and frequently, as the little choir was concluding, he said; Now let us have the hymn; How happy are they ho their Saviour obey. On every intelligent Christian who approached him at this time, he made the impression of the most eminent sanctity. They all left him with this testimony: that he was the holiest man they had ever seen. The following extracts from letters to Mrs. Jackson may be introduced here. March 14th, 1863. On next Monday there is to be a meeting of the chaplains of my corps, and I pray that good may result from the meeting. The time has about come for campaigning, and I hope early next week to leave my room and go into a tent near Hamilton's crossing, which is on the railroad, about five miles from Fredericksburg. It is rather a relief to get where there will be less comfort than in a room; as I hope thereby persons will be prevented from encroaching so much on my time. I am gr
n to duty. Matthew McClelland, first-class fireman; Joseph E. Vantine, first-class fireman; John Rush, first-class fireman; John Hickman, second-class fireman, United States steamer Richmond, in the attack on the Port Hudson batteries, March fourteenth, 1863, when the fire-room and other parts of the ship were filled with hot steam from injury to the boiler by a shot, these men, from the first moment of the casualty, stood firmly at their posts, and were conspicuous in their exertions to reme desired to cover his commanding officer with his person. Peter Howard, Boatswain's Mate ; Andrew Brinn, seaman; P. R. Vaughn, Sergeant of Marines, United States steamer Mississippi, in the attack on the Port Hudson batteries, night of March fourteenth, 1863. Commended for zeai and courage displayed in the performance of unusual and trying services, whilst the vessel was aground and exposed to a heavy fire. Samuel Woods, seamen, United States steamer Minnesota, but temporarily on board th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
), 2 howitzers; Grampus, Act. Master E. Sells (receiving ship); Great Western, (ordnance boat), Act. V. Lieut. W. F. Hamilton; Judge Torrence, (ordnance boat), Act. V. Lieut. J. F. Richardson; New National, Act. Master A. M. Grant (receiving ship), 1 howitzer; Red Rover, Act. Master W. R. Wells (hospital steamer), 1 gun; Sovereign (storeship, no battery), Act. Master T. Baldwin; William H. Brown (dispatch steamer), Act. V. Lieut. J. A. French. West Gulf squadron: Passage of Port Hudson, March 14th-15th, 1863.--Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut commanding; Capt. Thornton A. Jenkins, Fleet Captain. Hartford (flag-ship), Capt. James S. Palmer; Mississippi, Capt. Melancton Smith; Monongahela, Capt. J. P. McKinstry; Richmond, Com. James Alden; Genesee, Com. W. H. Macomb; Albatross, Lieut.-Com. John E. Hart: Kineo, Lieut.-Com. John Watters. Cooperating vessels of West Gulf Squadron, in Red River, May, 1863: Albatross, Lieut.-Com. John E. Hart; Estrella, Lieut.-Com. A. P. Cooke; Arizona, Act. V
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 13.93 (search)
The first battle of the Confederate ram Albemarle. by her Builder, Gilbert Elliott. In the spring of 1864 it was decided at Confederate headquarters that an attempt should be made to recapture Plymouth. For an account of the capture of New Berne and Plymouth, North Carolina, by the Union forces, see Vol. I., pp. 647-659. The Confederates made three attempts to recapture New Berne. On March 14th, 1863, General D. H. Hill sent General J. J. Pettigrew with infantry and seventeen guns to attack Fort Anderson, an earthwork on the Neuse opposite the town, and garrisoned by 300 men of the 92d New York. After a bombardment of several hours Pettigrew withdrew and Hill abandoned the project. During the action the gun-boats Hetzel and Hunchback opened upon the Confederate batteries, drove the enemy from the field, and covered the landing of the 85th New York, in aid of the garrison. On January 30th, 1864, an expedition, under General George E. Pickett, set out from Kinston, North C
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
els, run out, discharged, and instantly run back out of the way of harm from shot from below. and the advantage was all on the side of the Confederates. The air soon became thick with sulphurous smoke, and when the bonfire was a smoldering heap the darkness was most profound. Still the fight went on, and grape, canister, and shrapnel shot, and the bullets of sharpshooters, swept murderously over the decks as the vessels went nearer the bluff, and when, at one o'clock in the morning, March 14, 1863. after a contest of an hour and a half, the firing ceased, only the Hartford and her consort, the Albatross, had passed by. The Mississippi had run aground abreast the central heaviest battery, where her commander (Melancthon Smith) fought her under the concentrated fire of many large guns for half an hour, when he abandoned her and set her on fire. Lightened by the consumption of the flames, she floated down the river with her fine armament of twenty-one heavy guns and two howitzers, a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
and harbors some reverses were met with and some small vessels lost. These were mostly sailing vessels which were captured pretty much as the Harriet Lane had been, by river steamers protected by cotton-bales and manned by large numbers of sharpshooters. The fact of our government using sailing vessels for blockade duty was simply absurd. Only steamers make a blockade effective, and they should have speed enough to escape from a superior foe or capture an inferior one. On the 14th of March, 1863, it was decided by Rear-Admiral Farragut and General Banks that the former should move with his fleet past Port Hudson, which was at that time well fortified with nineteen heavy guns bearing on the water approaches. General Banks was to make a diversion with his Army against the forts, and what was left of the mortar flotilla was to open on the batteries prior to and during the passage of the fleet. Farragut seldom undertook to make a passage by a fort unless he had the mortar boat
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
d could slip into the small creeks if a gun-boat hove in sight. These little expeditions, though not very damaging to the Confederates, showed the spirit of the naval officers and their determination to give the enemy no rest. On the 14th of March, 1863, the Confederates made an attack on Fort Anderson, a work built by the Union troops opposite Newbern, and occupied by a regiment of volunteers. The enemy bombarded the works with field-pieces, and kept up the fire all night. In the mornin rendered by the Navy on this occasion, and their feeling of gratitude is well expressed by Colonel J. C. Belknap, as follows: Headquarters First Brigade, Wessel's Division, Newbern, N. C., March 15, 1863. Commodore — When, on the 14th of March, 1863, General Pettigrew, with eighteen pieces of artillery and over three thousand men, made his furious assault on Fort Anderson, an unfinished earth-work garrisoned by three hundred men of my command (the 92d New York Volunteers), the capture
s soon as it was dressed by the surgeon, he returned to his gun without the permission of the surgeon, and persisted in remaining at his quarters, using his right hand, until the action ceased. He was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; in action with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; fought the batteries of Vicksburgh twice; was in the memorable attack on Port Hudson on the fourteenth of March, 1863; was captain of a nine-inch gun in the naval nine-inch gun battery, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Edward Terry, placed in rear of Port Hudson during the siege of that place in 1863; he was also captain of a gun in the naval battery established at Baton Rouge, and commanded by Lieutenant Commander Edward Terry, after the repulse of the army and the death of General Williams at that place. 7. Walter E. Smith (ordinary seaman) is recommended for coolness and good conduct at the
Doc. 132.-recapture of Jacksonville, Fla. Report of General Saxton. Beaufort, S. C., March 14, 1863. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: sir: I have the honor to report, that the expedition which I sent up the St. John's River, Fla., consisting of the First regiment of South-Carolina volunteers, Colonel T. W. Higginson commanding, and a portion of tile Second South-Carolina volunteers, under Col. Montgomery, captured and took possession of Jacksonville, on Tuesday, the tenth instant. As I stated in my last report to you, the object of this expedition was to occupy Jacksonville, and make it the base of operations for arming the negroes, and securing, in this way, possession of the entire State of Florida. It gives me pleasure to report, that so far the objects of the expedition have been fully accomplished. The town is completely in our possession, and many prisoners. There has been constant skirmishing going on for several days and in every action the negro t
1 2 3 4 5 6