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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 22 22 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for March 14th, 1863 AD or search for March 14th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
and harbors some reverses were met with and some small vessels lost. These were mostly sailing vessels which were captured pretty much as the Harriet Lane had been, by river steamers protected by cotton-bales and manned by large numbers of sharpshooters. The fact of our government using sailing vessels for blockade duty was simply absurd. Only steamers make a blockade effective, and they should have speed enough to escape from a superior foe or capture an inferior one. On the 14th of March, 1863, it was decided by Rear-Admiral Farragut and General Banks that the former should move with his fleet past Port Hudson, which was at that time well fortified with nineteen heavy guns bearing on the water approaches. General Banks was to make a diversion with his Army against the forts, and what was left of the mortar flotilla was to open on the batteries prior to and during the passage of the fleet. Farragut seldom undertook to make a passage by a fort unless he had the mortar boat
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
d could slip into the small creeks if a gun-boat hove in sight. These little expeditions, though not very damaging to the Confederates, showed the spirit of the naval officers and their determination to give the enemy no rest. On the 14th of March, 1863, the Confederates made an attack on Fort Anderson, a work built by the Union troops opposite Newbern, and occupied by a regiment of volunteers. The enemy bombarded the works with field-pieces, and kept up the fire all night. In the mornin rendered by the Navy on this occasion, and their feeling of gratitude is well expressed by Colonel J. C. Belknap, as follows: Headquarters First Brigade, Wessel's Division, Newbern, N. C., March 15, 1863. Commodore — When, on the 14th of March, 1863, General Pettigrew, with eighteen pieces of artillery and over three thousand men, made his furious assault on Fort Anderson, an unfinished earth-work garrisoned by three hundred men of my command (the 92d New York Volunteers), the capture