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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 22 22 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for March 14th, 1863 AD or search for March 14th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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. Deeply do I regret to state that the following named officers (and a few privates, who could not be detected) absented themselves without leave during that period of the engagement in which my command participated, viz.: First Lieutenant B. F. Jackson and Captain Singletary, of the Ninth Louisiana regiment. All of which is respectfully submitted. L. A. Stafford, Colonel, commanding Second Louisiana Brigade. Report of Colonel Crutchfield. headquarters artillery, Second corps, March 14, 1863. Lieutenant-Colonel C. J. Faulkner, Assistant Adjutant-General: Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the artillery of this army corps in the battle of Cedar Run, of August ninth, 1862: The road on which we advanced debouched from a piece of woods upon the immediate battle-field, which was open and somewhat broken, a brook running across it and the prolongation of the road, and making a small angle with our general line of battle. The advanc
e is a deserving and brave gentleman. Ordnance Sergeant Brazleman deserves special mention for his assiduity and unflagging devotion in supplying ammunition, and in the performance of all his duties. He, on this occasion, added to his well-established reputation of an intelligent, brave, and meritorious soldier. I am, Major, very respectfully, J. B. Walton, Colonel, commanding. Report of Colonel Crutchfield of Second battle of Manassas. headquarters artillery Second corps, March 14, 1863. Colonel Charles J. Faulkner, Assistant Adjutant-General: Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the artillery of this army corps in the engagements known as the second battle of Manassas: On the afternoon of Thursday our forces were so disposed that, Sudley Mills being to their left and front, the arc they formed presented a convex front toward the pike from Groveton to Centreville, along which the enemy advanced from Warrenton. About half p
ot exceed twelve or fourteen thousand men. To withdraw the force of Weitzel from Berwick's Bay would open the La Fourche to the enemy, who had ten or fifteen thousand men upon the Teche, and the withdrawal of the forces from New Orleans would expose that city to the assault of the enemy from every point. The strength of the enemy at Port Hudson was then believed to be from eighteen to twenty thousand. It is now known, with absolute certainty, that the garrison on the night of the fourteenth of March, 1863, was not less than sixteen thousand effective troops. The statement of the General-in-Chief of the army in his report of the fifteenth of November, 1863, that, had our forces invested Port Hudson at this time, it could have been easily reduced, as its garrison was weak, was without any just foundation. Information received from Brigadier-General W. W. R. Beall, one of the officers in command of Port Hudson at this time, as well as from other officers, justifies this opinion. It w